Programming HTML5 Applications
Building Powerful Cross-Platform Environments in JavaScript
Publisher: O'Reilly Media
Released: November 2011
Pages: 144

HTML5 is not just a replacement for plugins. It also makes the Web a first-class development environment by giving JavaScript programmers a solid foundation for building industrial-strength applications. This practical guide takes you beyond simple site creation and shows you how to build self-contained HTML5 applications that can run on mobile devices and compete with desktop apps.

You’ll learn powerful JavaScript tools for exploiting HTML5 elements, and discover new methods for working with data, such as offline storage and multithreaded processing. Complete with code samples, this book is ideal for experienced JavaScript and mobile developers alike.

  • Store session data in the browser with local storage objects
  • Save trips to the server: store larger amounts of data with IndexedDB
  • Give browsers limited access to a user’s system to read and upload files
  • Take your app offline—and speed up page loading when it’s online
  • Use Web Workers to create multithreaded applications
  • Transfer data between browser and server more efficiently with Web Sockets
  • Learn about HTML5 tags for forms, multimedia, graphics, and geolocation

"HTML5 is all the rage these days, but it's more than just a buzzword. Programming HTML5 Applications provides the knowledge to guide you through all the new technologies needed to make modern web applications."

--Ralph Whitbeck, cohost of The Official jQuery Podcast

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O'Reilly MediaProgramming HTML5 Applications
 
3.5

(based on 8 reviews)

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  • 4 Stars

     

    (6)

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    (2)

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75%

of respondents would recommend this to a friend.

Pros

  • Well-written (6)
  • Easy to understand (4)
  • Helpful examples (4)

Cons

    Best Uses

    • Intermediate (6)
    • Expert (4)
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      • Developer (7)

    Reviewed by 8 customers

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    (2 of 3 customers found this review helpful)

     
    4.0

    Titled wrong, but great book!

    By Tony Dunsworth

    from Independence, MO

    About Me Developer

    Verified Reviewer

    Pros

    • Accurate
    • Easy to understand
    • Well-written

    Cons

    • Mistitled

    Best Uses

    • Intermediate

    Comments about O'Reilly Media Programming HTML5 Applications:

    Mr. Kessin, an Israeli programmer and developer, has written a very interesting and for me, at least, a very effective book about client side programming in Javascript which allows a developer to create more detailed and more robust web based applications.

    Having said that, I admit, I have a problem with the title of the book, not its substance. The title, for me, tends to do the same thing with HTML 5 that had been done with AJAX and the term "Web 2.0″; cheapening the term by extending it beyond its normal scope. Be that as it may, this is a very good book for the moderately experienced Internet developer who wants to take an application to the next level.

    Mr. Kessin takes many of the new ideas which are possible within both HTML 5 and modern web application development and demonstrates good ways to use Javascript to create browser independent applications which can work in most modern browsers. Even better is the fact that he does not rely on JQuery plug ins or other Javascript libraries. His instructions are based on learning to write the code behind the application by yourself so you aren't dependent upon libraries unnecessarily. There are a couple of exceptions to this, such as IndexedDB, where the JQuery library makes the API more approachable and more useful. However, since those are exceptions, you get a very grounded education about how to extend javascript and html5 to create some very interesting applications.

    Again, in my opinion, the book should be renamed Modern Web Application Development with Javascript and HTML5. However, having said that, this is an excellent book to help you write better applications, including how to use tools such as Selenium and JSLint to clean it up.

    (1 of 1 customers found this review helpful)

     
    4.0

    prgramming HTML 5 applications

    By Abi

    from chennai

    About Me Designer, Developer

    Pros

    • Easy to understand
    • Helpful examples
    • Well-written

    Cons

      Best Uses

      • Expert
      • Intermediate
      • Novice

      Comments about O'Reilly Media Programming HTML5 Applications:

      The 'Programming HTML 5 Applications' book is great for a programmers. Atleast thats my opinion. This book starts from basics and builds gradually. It covers real-world scenarios in its examples when illustrating each of the HTML 5 feature. If you are new to Javascript, it shouldnt be an issue as the chapter 2 and 3 of this book covers what is required. I really enjoyed working out the examples of offline web applications,HTML 5 form elements and microdata. I am yet to do the canvas and geolocation sections. I am still working through those sections.

      In my opinion following are the best books for HTML 5 : (1 being the best) :

      1) Head First - HTML 5

      2) HTML 5 Up and Running by Mark Pilgrim

      3) Programming HTML 5 Applications by Zachary

      4) HTML 5 : The Missing manual

      For more books I suggest you check on OReilly and Amazon websites.

      (0 of 3 customers found this review helpful)

       
      4.0

      No hay que juzgar un libro por su título

      By DGGONZALEZ

      from Buenos Aires, Argentina

      About Me Developer

      Verified Reviewer

      Pros

      • Accurate
      • Concise
      • Well-written

      Cons

      • Not comprehensive enough
      • Too basic

      Best Uses

      • Expert
      • Intermediate

      Comments about O'Reilly Media Programming HTML5 Applications:

      A la hora de hacer la crítica de un libro uno tiene que tener en cuenta las intenciones del autor, el público al que va dirigido y el tema del que se trata.

      Html5 es un proyecto en construcción, su múltiples posibilidades, el capricho de Steve Jobs de no utilizar Flash en sus productos y las múltiples metidas de pata de Adobe en las últimas versiones llevaron a una adopción temprana por parte de los desarrolladores. Las editoriales tuvieron que responder lanzando libros tempranamente.

      Todo este circunloquio es para que el lector entienda con que se va a encontrar. Este no es un manual tradicional publicado por una editorial tradicional sobre un tema conocido. Es una introducción a un tema en constante evolución publicado por una editorial que ve a sus libros como algo vivo que puede corregirse y mejorarse con ayuda de sus lectores.
      Lo primero que hay que mejorar es el título. Si bien se habla de HTML5 y sus posibilidades el grueso del texto se refiere a la utilización de javascript, un lenguaje que tiene adeptos y enemigos por igual.
      Antes de leer este libro sería bueno empezar con alguno de los otros de esta colección que introduzcan en el tema de HTML5 y JAVASCRIPT, también a menos que uno necesite sí o sí empezar a desarrollar aplicaciones web esperar a ediciones posteriores.
      En resúmen para quienes quieran buscar su propio camino es una buena opción, para quienes quieran un mapa detallado mejor esperen un poco

      (2 of 2 customers found this review helpful)

       
      4.0

      Should be JavaScript for HTML5, but ...

      By TaQ

      from São José do Rio Preto, SP, Brazil

      About Me Developer

      Verified Reviewer

      Pros

      • Easy to understand
      • Helpful examples
      • Well-written

      Cons

        Best Uses

        • Expert
        • Intermediate

        Comments about O'Reilly Media Programming HTML5 Applications:

        I liked the book. I got it from the blogger reviews program because I was really interested on it's content, and I knew, by the table of contents, it will not be about just HTML tags and semantics, but about the tools used to build modern web apps.

        Some people can buy this book wrong because of its title - I think "JavaScript for HTML5" will be a better choice - but hey folks, I always read the table of contents or an excerpt before buy it. For what the number of pages and all the topics the author proposed to talk about, I think it's a good book. It lacks only the main "hook" on its title: a bit more of HTML5 tags with examples.

        (5 of 6 customers found this review helpful)

         
        4.0

        Review of Programming HTML5 Applications

        By m2web

        from Erlanger, KY

        Comments about O'Reilly Media Programming HTML5 Applications:

        With the emergence of the popularity of HTML5 many books are quickly hitting the shelves. Here is an offering that provides both a high-level overview along with example code.

        The first chapter, The Web as a Platform for Applications provides an historical backdrop for the HTML5 standard by reviewing the founding of the web, JavaScript's history, the emergence of DHTML and AJAX, and laying of the ground work for the present environment.

        The second chapter, The Power of JavaScript, reviews some nice aspects of the language such as functional programming, closure, being able to expand objects, and functions with prototypes.

        Chapter three, as the chapter title implies covers the JQuery, "a JavaScript Library that simplifies HTML document traversing, event handling, animating, and Ajax interactions for rapid web development."

        The next chapter details ExtJS. While ExtJS is another JavaScript library, this library provides more than a DOM manipulation and event handling. ExtJS has several objects that provide the developer with several tools to create rich internet applications. The chapter contains good content but still needs another "proof-reading pass" as there are several typos and even a "TODO" or two.

        Chapter 5 details using QUnit and Selenium to test JavaScript. This chapter provides good code examples using these two test frame works. Chapter 6 shows the developer how to use the browser's localStorage and sessionStorage objects as well as consider browser-based databases.

        The next chapter, Take it Offline, deals with using HTML5's new manifest file from which a user can load multiple files. Chapter 8, Splitting Up Work Through Web Workers, takes the reader through use of web workers to do, as the chapter title suggests, a division of tasks.

        The reader is then brought to the topic of Web Sockets where bidirectional data can be established over TCP. Finally the chapter Internet, 2017 takes the user through the consideration of new and future technologies, of which HTML5 is a part.

        In summary, while this book does provide a good overview of the above topics, it may not provide the detail that some developers desire. Also, at least in its early release stage, as of July 2011, the text shows many signs of a draft in progress with missing punctuation and various TODO's sprinkled in some of the chapters. However, it does provide a quick and basic overview of the concepts and parts of HTML5 and JavaScript that are necessary to move forward.

        (4 of 7 customers found this review helpful)

         
        2.0

        HTML5 plus related technologies

        By Peter

        from Melbourne, Australia

        About Me Developer

        Verified Reviewer

        Pros

        • Helpful examples

        Cons

        • Not comprehensive enough
        • Too many errors

        Best Uses

        • Intermediate

        Comments about O'Reilly Media Programming HTML5 Applications:

        "Programming HTML5 Applications" is a new book from O'Reilly media that focusses on some of the new technologies available in HTML5. It also places significant emphasis on the language of web applications – JavaScript.

        The book starts with a brief history of the Internet and the web, before covering some of the trickier features of JavaScript in Chapter 2 – primarily closures, the event-oriented nature of JavaScript, and the DOM.

        Next is a good overview of two JavaScript frameworks: the ultra-popular JQuery and the more application oriented ExtJS, before moving on to some testing frameworks – QUnit for JavaScript unit testing, and Selenium for browser interface testing.

        The author then moves on to HTML5, briefly covering local storage, application caching, web workers and web sockets.

        Finally, some interesting server side technologies are described: the "cloud" paradigm, node.js and Erlang. The book concludes with some useful JavaScript tools.

        The copy provided for this review was an "early access" version which hasn't been through the full editing process. The book clearly still requires considerable polish – I was surprised to find that the HTML5 chapters cover less than half the book; they feel incomplete. The "web workers" chapter contains a detailed example, but the other HTML5 chapters do not.

        When learning a new technology, I like expert, clear advice about best-practise, and the production-readiness of each technology. This was lacking in the chapters on HTML5. For instance, there is little mention of which browser versions support which technology – an important consideration when deciding whether or not to use a particular feature.

        Currently much better HTML5 resources are the truly excellent Dive into HTML5 and HTML5 Rocks.

        In contrast, the JavaScript chapters are well-written and informative, particularly the framework and testing chapters. I would have liked to have seen some analysis of the other major frameworks. The overview of QUnit and Selenium and their use-cases made for a useful introduction to these tools.

        When the final copy comes out, hopefully the HTML5 chapters will have filled out, and the many little errors corrected. Assuming this happens, this book will serve as an introduction to the main technologies involved in building an HTML5 application.

        Disclosure: This review applies to an "early access" version of the book and was provided by O'Reilly Media as part of their blogger review program.

        (3 of 5 customers found this review helpful)

         
        2.0

        Interesting but...

        By BGen Specific

        from Omaha, NE

        About Me Developer, Sys Admin

        Verified Reviewer

        Pros

        • Easy to understand
        • Helpful examples
        • Well-written

        Cons

        • Too many errors

        Best Uses

        • Intermediate

        Comments about O'Reilly Media Programming HTML5 Applications:

        I enjoyed this book and learned a few interesting things along the way. But I would tend to describe myself more as a JavaScript intermediate "user" more than a skilled JavaScript "programmer". If you are an intermediate JavaScript user - this book will help you rise to the next level. If you are already a skilled JavaScript programmer, I think you may find that there is not sufficient topical (HTML5) information in this book to justify your purchase.

        Zachary Kessin has been involved with web development since the early 90's. His experience as a working programmer shows clearly as he shares the lessons born from these experiences. It reads like a talk from an experienced programmer sharing the tips of the trade - not only in terms of how - but also why you do things. Overall this is good - but sometimes it seems like he slips into a shorthand way of describing things that takes a couple readings to decipher.

        At 132 pages cover to cover, this is a short book, which isn't necessarily a bad thing.

        A better title for this book might be, "Modern JavaScript and HTML5." Beginning in chapter two, the author takes the reader on a tour of "advanced" (my word) JavaScript methods, JQuery and ExtJS before discussing tools and methods for testing JavaScript. I was aware of many of these topics at various levels previously, but the author does a good job of explaining them at a high level and why you would use them. These chapters aren't really tutorials, but you get enough information to start exploring each area - which is probably how most of us learn JavaScript anyway.

        From chapter six the book turns to HTML5 coverage beginning with a discussion about the LocalStorage APIs. It goes on to offline applications, web workers and web sockets. It starts off as mostly similar content to what you would see in http://diveintohtml5.org/ or similar sites, but where it shines is that the author ties these features to real-world examples and back to the topics he previously discussed (like ExtJS and JQuery). Throughout most of the book, the examples reinforce the text pretty well, although they could be commented better in several cases.

        I think the main problem I have with this book is what I mentioned earlier - the title of the book doesn't seem to mesh with the content as well as you might hope. For a book titled "Programming HTML5 Applications", my expectations were totally different than the (pretty good) content that was in this book. I think I expected that the book might take that familiar path of developing a non-trivial "HTML5 Application" teaching how to use the HTML5 APIs as it goes. I would have liked that better.

        So... Would I recommend this book? Probably not. It was interesting. I learned a few things (much from chapters two and three). It was a good start. I wouldn't mind looking at it again when it is finished - I might change my mind (a great effort on finishing chapters eight and nine would be a good start). But the problem right now is that there is already so much of the sort of HTML5 information that this book provides - in a very similar format ("this is what is new - here's a snippit") - available for free at a number of great HTML5 sites (like "Dive into HTML5" as mentioned before.)

        Note: This was my first "Early Release" book I've looked at. Apparently, "Early Release" indicates that the book was released directly from the author without the benefit of a review by an editor. I found the large number of typos, misspellings, unfinished sections, etc. in the text to be quite distracting. I've tried to look past this. I think that early access is a great idea especially for fast moving domains like web development. But if this sort of thing bugs you - you might want to wait for the normal release.

        Disclosure: I was provided with a free PDF copy of this book by O'Reilly as a part of their "Blogger Review Program" program. (http://www.oreillynet.com/oreilly/bloggers/home.csp)

        (2 of 4 customers found this review helpful)

         
        4.0

        Nice intro book to HTML5

        By sushil

        from india

        About Me Developer

        Verified Reviewer

        Pros

        • Well-written

        Cons

        • Too basic

        Best Uses

        • Expert

        Comments about O'Reilly Media Programming HTML5 Applications:

        This is a small book that introduces you the world of HTML5. It gives you brief overview around what's happening on the web these days in relation to change in some of the key specifications and all new concepts that are being introduced into the browsers to make them able to support robust Web Applications.

        It has got the one of the best chapter I ever came across in any book on evolution of Web.Starting from static pages to today's highly interactive Web pages.
        It introduces us with How javascript and some of its libraries like jQuery and extJS are gaining fame and how the world of web development is changing.

        I enjoyed going over the book the chapters on Testing javascript applications,Introduction to localstorage and How implementing Offline Storage can be useful in Web Applications when you dont have access to web are quite good.

        It also introduces the concept of Web Workers as javascript's process that can perform computations and pass messages back and forth with the main process and other workers and help writing complex web applications.

        I would recommend this book for anybody who is willing to get an introduction to HTML 5 and how the new Web will be in the coming years. However it should not be taken as a HTML 5 reference book as it does not covers many of the other important things that are being introduced as a part of HTML 5 like canvas, video, Geo-Location etc. And the example given and small and not very detailed.

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