HTML5: The Missing Manual
The Book That Should Have Been in the Box
Publisher: O'Reilly Media
Released: August 2011
Pages: 450

HTML5 is more than a markup language—it's a dozen independent web standards all rolled into one. Until now, all it's been missing is a manual. With this thorough, jargon-free guide, you'll learn how to build web apps that include video tools, dynamic drawings, geolocation, offline web apps, drag-and-drop, and many other features. HTML5 is the future of the Web, and with this book you'll reach it quickly.

The important stuff you need to know:

  • Structure web pages in a new way. Learn how HTML5 helps make web design tools and search engines work smarter.
  • Add audio and video without plugins. Build playback pages that work in every browser.
  • Draw with Canvas. Create shapes, pictures, text, and animation—and make them interactive.
  • Go a long way with style. Use CSS3 and HTML5 to jazz up your pages and adapt them for mobile devices.
  • Build web apps with rich desktop features. Let users work with your app offline, and process user-selected files in the browser.
  • Create location-aware apps. Write geolocation applications directly in the browser.
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oreillyHTML5: The Missing Manual
 
4.0

(based on 2 reviews)

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(17 of 17 customers found this review helpful)

 
4.0

Simple introduction to HTML 5

By Michal Konrad Owsiak

from Poland

About Me Designer, Developer

Verified Reviewer

Pros

  • Easy to understand
  • Helpful examples
  • Well-written

Cons

  • Too basic

Best Uses

  • Novice
  • Student

Comments about oreilly HTML5: The Missing Manual:

I have mixed feelings when it comes to this book. At some point it is entertaining and can teach you the basics of HTML very well, however, it is too basic for a professionals or semiprofessionals. Topics covered within the book are well explained, it covers basics of the HTML 5. You will find here information regarding new tags, new ways of input validation, progress bars, sliders, video embedding, audio embedding, managing the canvas, working in offline environment, etc. If you are not sure whether this book is for, ask yourself question, where you put yourself. Do you start your adventure with HTML? Or maybe you are HTML veteran? If you are about to begin your experience with HTML 5, this book sounds like a good read. At the very beginning, Matthew lays down the basics of the HTML 5. You literally build a simple HTML page by extending it step by step. Second chapter gives you the overview of how to create a structure of the page, how to use new tags and what to avoid (especially the old markups). I really enjoyed part four, where details related to forms are laid down – how to create them, how to validate values, how to provide users with input suggestions – entirely at the browser's side. Video and audio related section will shade some light in terms of the variety of video/audio codecs – there are few of them, and they can make you confused, believe me. Another great benefit is that you get CSS explained by examples rather than by definition. However, you may fell slightly disappointed if you are looking for a CSS reference.

I like the style of the book. It is really simple written, at least that's what I think. You shouldn't have any issues with following what Matt tries to explain. Keep in mind, however, that this book is rather brief overview of HTML 5 rather than comprehensive HTML 5 reference. Great plus for Matt for putting lots of references to external resources and for really impressive examples. You will be guided how to find them at the very begging of the book.

(17 of 17 customers found this review helpful)

 
4.0

HTML 5 : The missing manual

By Abi

from Chennai,India

About Me Architect, Designer, Developer

Pros

  • Accurate
  • Concise
  • Easy to understand
  • Helpful examples
  • Well-written

Cons

    Best Uses

    • Intermediate
    • Novice
    • Student

    Comments about oreilly HTML5: The Missing Manual:

    This is a beginner to intermediate level book written in a very simple language that anybody can understand. A little knowledge of HTML, CSS and javascript programming is necessary to understand this book. If its been a while since you worked on CSS or Javascript, there are Appendix sections to quickly freshen up your memory. This is not a book with pages and pages of wry technical material documentation. Its a very elegantly written communicative style of book. I prefer such ones coz it makes learning easy and those are the only type of books I complete reading =)

    There are 12 chapters in this book broadly classified into 3 parts. The part 1 has introduction to HTML 5, the HTML5's semantics, and how meaningful markup is built. Part 2 talks of web-forms, how audio/video are handled, dwells deep into how canvas works and how to boost style using CSS3.Part 3 focuses entirely on 'Desktop' side features of HTML5. How to build applications that can work 'offline', how apps can communicate to web server etc. are covered in Part 3.

    Lot of examples and screenshots provided as and when required. For the HTML5 features the author also highlights the browser support for that feature. This is much required because not all browsers support all the features of HTML 5. Though Canvas and Geolocation are covered well in this book, I feel these are topics that require a book on its own. For an in-depth study I suggest HTML 5 Canvas. Overall this is a very good book on HTML 5 that gives pointers for the water-cooler talk in office =) Yes, I recommend this book to you.

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