Getting Started with RFID
Identify Objects in the Physical World with Arduino
Publisher: Maker Media, Inc
Released: March 2012
Pages: 44

If you want to experiment with radio frequency identification (RFID), this book is the perfect place to start. All you need is some experience with Arduino and Processing, the ability to connect basic circuits on a breadboard with jumper wire—and you’re good to go. You’ll be guided through three hands-on projects that let you experience RFID in action.

RFID is used in various applications, such as identifying store items or accessing a toll road with an EZPass system. After you build each of the book’s projects in succession, you’ll have the knowledge to pursue RFID applications of your own.

  • Use Processing to get a sense of how RFID readers behave
  • Connect Arduino to an RFID reader and discover how to use RFID tags as keys
  • Automate your office or home, using RFID to turn on systems when you’re present, and turn them off when you leave
  • Get a complete list of materials you need, along with code samples and helpful illustrations
  • Tackle each project with easy-to-follow explanations of how the code works
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oreillyGetting Started with RFID
 
3.5

(based on 2 reviews)

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(1 of 1 customers found this review helpful)

 
3.0

Getting Started with RFID by Tom Igoe

By healthyfatboy

from Nashua, NH

About Me Engineer, Tinkerer

Verified Reviewer

Pros

  • Concise
  • Easy to understand

Cons

  • Too short

Best Uses

  • Intermediate
  • Novice

Comments about oreilly Getting Started with RFID:

For those wanting to get started in the very basics of RFID, Getting Started with RFID by Tom Igoe is a good way to get started. For those looking for something more in-depth, you'll definitely want to go elsewhere.
I have always been interested in learning how RFID works so this book piqued my interest when I saw it. I got a copy of it and was happy that I could learn the basics so quickly but was also disappointed that there were really only 27 pages of material. Yes, 27 pages. At least it gets you going quickly and is quite useful if you know a little about Arduino and electronics.
The first project shows how to interface an RFID with Processing. The second is essentially the same but connects to an Arduino and outputs everything on the serial monitor instead of going through Processing.
Other than being short, one of my gripes is that the few pictures it has, the schematics if you want to call them that, are basically hand-drawn sketches. I thought the book was less professional that it could have been had a high resolution picture or a proper schematic (possibly in fritzing) been used but that was up to the author.
Overall, it's a quick, easy read that only take 30 minutes max to go through, and that includes connecting everything up and getting it running. I wouldn't pay much for something like this as there's not much substance but if you can get a deal on it, then it's a handy starter reference to have around.

Disclaimer: This book was received as part of the O'Reilly Blogger Review Program. All comments represent my thoughts and opinions.

(1 of 1 customers found this review helpful)

 
4.0

Good Introduction

By Anna

from United States

About Me Maker

Verified Reviewer

Pros

  • Concise
  • Easy to understand
  • Well-written

Cons

    Best Uses

    • Novice
    • Student

    Comments about oreilly Getting Started with RFID:

    This is a very short "book" on RFID (Radio Frequency Identification), a way to tag and identify objects over varying ranges, and how to use Arduino to create a few interesting RFID projects. The book assumes that you have some experience with Arduino and micro-controllers (i.e., do you know what a breadboard, jumper wires, and circuits are?).

    We start with a very brief introduction to RFID, follow up with two introductory technical tutorials on Arduino, and end with a fairly simple home automation project.

    The book is only 28 pages, so it's more of a long tutorial than a book, but it still acts as a good introduction to RFID.

    Disclaimer: I received this book for free through the O'Reilly Blogger program.

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