Building Microservices
Designing Fine-Grained Systems
Publisher: O'Reilly Media
Final Release Date: February 2015
Pages: 280

Distributed systems have become more fine-grained in the past 10 years, shifting from code-heavy monolithic applications to smaller, self-contained microservices. But developing these systems brings its own set of headaches. With lots of examples and practical advice, this book takes a holistic view of the topics that system architects and administrators must consider when building, managing, and evolving microservice architectures.

Microservice technologies are moving quickly. Author Sam Newman provides you with a firm grounding in the concepts while diving into current solutions for modeling, integrating, testing, deploying, and monitoring your own autonomous services. You’ll follow a fictional company throughout the book to learn how building a microservice architecture affects a single domain.

  • Discover how microservices allow you to align your system design with your organization’s goals
  • Learn options for integrating a service with the rest of your system
  • Take an incremental approach when splitting monolithic codebases
  • Deploy individual microservices through continuous integration
  • Examine the complexities of testing and monitoring distributed services
  • Manage security with user-to-service and service-to-service models
  • Understand the challenges of scaling microservice architectures
Table of Contents
Product Details
About the Author
Colophon
Recommended for You
Customer Reviews

REVIEW SNAPSHOT®

by PowerReviews
oreillyBuilding Microservices
 
3.8

(based on 24 reviews)

Ratings Distribution

  • 5 Stars

     

    (12)

  • 4 Stars

     

    (5)

  • 3 Stars

     

    (2)

  • 2 Stars

     

    (1)

  • 1 Stars

     

    (4)

78%

of respondents would recommend this to a friend.

Pros

  • Easy to understand (16)
  • Well-written (16)
  • Accurate (12)
  • Concise (10)
  • Helpful examples (7)

Cons

  • Not comprehensive enough (4)
  • Too basic (3)

Best Uses

  • Intermediate (16)
  • Novice (14)
  • Expert (10)
  • Student (7)
    • Reviewer Profile:
    • Developer (20), Architect (6), Designer (4), Sys admin (4), Educator (3)

Reviewed by 24 customers

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3.0

An interesting but pricey discussion about microservices

By Jascha

from Barcelona

About Me Developer, Sys Admin

Pros

  • Easy to understand
  • Well-written

Cons

  • Not comprehensive enough

Best Uses

  • Intermediate
  • Novice

Comments about oreilly Building Microservices:

Spanning through almost 300 pages, Building Microservices was released at the end of 2015 and aim to provide a very high overview (believe me when I say very high) of microservices and all the aspects that should be taken into account when transitioning from a monolithic application to many small independent services that work together in harmony.

Throughout the text, the author introduces many different topics that must be taken into account, such as testing, and monitoring, among others. Each chapter focuses on a specific subject. Here the author describes the problems of the old one huge application only and the benefits we get by moving towards microservices. He also covers the new challenges this new architecture brings with itself (nothing is free, after all). The whole thing is often coupled with real life anectods from the author's experience.

As stated in the introduction, the book does not dive into any kind of platform or technology, thus ruling out becoming outdated in half a year. At the same time, though, it doesn't satisfy those readers interested in a more hands-on thing.

Building Microservices is a pleasant read. Well written and easy to follow. Most of its content does not necessarily apply only to microservices. The author does indeed discuss generic topics such as team building, versioning, logging. All these concepts apply to a broader spectrum and are interesting to a greater audience. On the other hand, most of them are already known to the majority of the readers. When I first got my hands on this book there was something I was particularly interested in: a step by step example showing me how to break down a monolith into microservices. This is indeed covered by the author (starting at chapter 5, by heart), but at such a conversational level that part of my hunger was not satisfied.

Overall, a good read. Everyone can benefit from it. Still, the book is quite pricey. When I have reached the back cover I was thinking within myself if it was worth it, when we have so many free resources, such as Martin Fowler's.

As usual, you can find more reviews on my personal blog: books.lostinmalloc.com. Feel free to pass by and share your thoughts!

 
4.0

The book to lead you into the world of web services

By Nicola

from Milano, Italy

About Me Developer, Software Architect

Verified Buyer

Pros

  • Accurate
  • Easy to understand
  • Well-written

Cons

  • Will Age Quickly

Best Uses

  • Architect
  • Intermediate
  • Novice

Comments about oreilly Building Microservices:

Building Microservices is a well thought out, all round guide to the fundamental things you should consider in adopting a microservice oriented architecture. Although the book does give advice on tools to consider to tackle specific issues, its main value is in how it points out the most important trade offs you will have to face.
The reason why I'm only giving it four out of five star is the fact that Building Microservices was clearly written before Docker disrupted the deployment field; containers do get mentioned, but only as an afterthought.
This book is still well worth reading, containers notwithstanding. I'll be very happy to read a second edition when it comes out.

(4 of 9 customers found this review helpful)

 
1.0

Factual misinformation, opinion piece.

By Yurii

from Vancouver, BC

Verified Reviewer

Pros

    Cons

    • Too many errors

    Best Uses

      Comments about oreilly Building Microservices:

      I must admit that I didn't read the whole book, I had to stop after going through Chapter 1.

      Just in that first chapter, the author managed to misinform the readers on a few subjects.

      Firstly, OSGi has not "emerged as a framework to allow plug-ins to be installed in the Eclipse Java IDE". OSGi has started 6 years before Eclipse project have chosen it to orchestrate plugin management.

      Then, the whole rant on OSGi applicability is an opinion piece. Sure, it does require more work to create component-based systems in any tech and saying that "it is easy for OSGI (sic!) to become a much bigger source of complexity than its benefits warrant." is rather pointless.

      Secondly, the blurb on Erlang is straight up incorrect. Erlang modules can't be stopped or restarted, they are not units of executions. Barring trivial scenarios, doing upgrades is not easy (the process relationships are not formally defined and orchestrating complex upgrades is a major undertaking). Also, saying that "Erlang even supports running more than one version of the module at a given" is misinforming as there is no actual way to *run* more than one version of the module at a given time. There is a technique that Erlang uses to retain the version that is on its way out for a little while (to allow running code to complete) before being phased out, but there's no way to run multiple versions in parallel. In fact, this is a source of a major pain in Erlang development, if a library that you use is hardwired to an older/forked _incompatible_ version of another library your app depends on. A much better unit of dependency in Erlang is actually an application (as it couples modules & state) but it still doesn't quite solve the problem of multiple versions.

      There are a few other opinion rants I found in the free preview, but I'll leave them out of the scope of this review.

      (1 of 1 customers found this review helpful)

       
      4.0

      An X-rated rollercoaster on the skin-changing snake of Arch.

      By David Salvador

      from Barcelona, Spain

      About Me Designer, Developer, Educator, Maker

      Verified Buyer

      Pros

      • Helpful examples
      • Well-written

      Cons

        Best Uses

        • Expert
        • Intermediate
        • Novice
        • Student

        Comments about oreilly Building Microservices:

        The context of the reader: I am an Engineer with 19y of professional experience. Last 6 years dedicated to interactive design and development (Frontend, Flash, HTML5 infrastructures) with a background in Java Backend and going back through Embedded SW to System-on-Chip electronic design and rough electronic R&D. I bought the book after following several authoritative links to it, as I want to bring to articulate my career to a new height. I read the book from start to finish, one hour each day for 10 days, with my morning coffee, before entering work. Explorative-ly, I was moved to read and assimilate every section before continuing to the next topic since I felt the reader had put loads of care on structuring a complex topic in chapters and in sections within the chapter; so I was reading in two concurrent threads(1. The topics and 2. How the writer structured the content for communication). I enjoyed the book as it provided me with inspiration and confidence on aspects of my day-to-day, I felt backed-up by data that I could use in future to prepare design meetings. Also, it increased my awareness towards the commitment necessary to transcend the challenges of keeping servicing the new market cloud.

        I plan to re-read specific chapters, now with more focused purpose on certain challenges I am facing.

        (3 of 7 customers found this review helpful)

         
        1.0

        Ruined by a lack of objectivity

        By David

        from UK

        About Me Developer, Software Architect

        Verified Reviewer

        Pros

          Cons

          • Biased Explanations
          • Confused Explanations
          • Lack Of Objectivity
          • Not comprehensive enough
          • Too basic
          • Too many errors

          Best Uses

          • 4 Years As Developer
          • Intermediate
          • Postgraduate Student

          Comments about oreilly Building Microservices:

          I bought this book for Kindle and returned it. I posted the following on Amazon yesterday. I hope it's useful to somebody.
          I bought this yesterday and skim read it for two or three hours. I became increasingly angry at the money I felt I'd wasted. I wanted an overview of microservices and the chapter titles suggested the book would provide just that. Instead, in pretty well every chapter I was confronted with a rant. On initial reading, Mr Newman seems to have expended more energy attacking other architectural approaches than describing and promoting microservices. The strongest message I received, without justification, is that monolith = layering = tangled coding. Well, I am aware of texts that claim layering can resolve tangled monoliths. I had hoped for an objective book that would allow me to make up my own mind about the value of microservices and teach me how to use them.
          In contrast to other reviewers, I did not find explanations clear. Indeed, much seems to be left unexplained. I read several sections where Mr Newman described being part of a team that got into difficulties at some stage of a microservice implementation. On each occasion, rather than detailing what the team did about it, Mr Newman concluded with a warning to be careful in such situations. The missing detail is what I thought I had paid for.
          I had intended to persevere. That so many others have given the book five stars had me thinking that the content I wanted must be in there after all, and I would just have to wade through Mr Newman's prejudices to reach it. But I decided to check for an alternative. In the end I returned the book (Kindle - it's great that you can so easily), and have gone for Microservices: Flexible Software Architectures by Eberhard Wolff instead. Already, I have found that just the specimen pages read so much better than this book (and the Wolff book is translated from German). Ten minutes with those has already proved more profitable than the hours I wasted yesterday evening on Newman's book.
          Finally, I scarcely think that this book is a good advertisement for ThoughtWorks or O'Reilly.

          (2 of 2 customers found this review helpful)

           
          5.0

          A must-read for everyone embarking on Microservices

          By Alex

          from Stuttgart, Germany

          About Me Architect, Developer

          Verified Buyer

          Pros

          • Accurate
          • Concise
          • Well-written

          Cons

            Best Uses

            • Expert
            • Intermediate

            Comments about oreilly Building Microservices:

            I wish I had this book when we started with Microservices - but fortunately, we're still early enough in our journey to benefit from the author's insights. His chapter on the pitfalls of testing in the microservices world reflected exactly the trap we were in, and we're currently taking his advice.

            (2 of 2 customers found this review helpful)

             
            5.0

            Excellent overview and introduction to microservices

            By Gareth

            from Auckland, NZ

            About Me Developer, Sys Admin

            Verified Buyer

            Pros

            • Accurate
            • Concise
            • Easy to understand
            • Well-written

            Cons

              Best Uses

              • Expert
              • Intermediate

              Comments about oreilly Building Microservices:

              This was an excellent introduction to gaining insight at the big picture requirements, thoughts and methodologies used in Microservices. I read this as a means to get the high level understanding on Microservices which is exactly what I got from this book.

              Well written and well structured it covers most of the important topics that come up in conversation around the web on Microservices. It doesn't go into detail or provide examples but that was not what the book was about, rather it outlines approaches to solving particular problems associated with building microservices.

              It's definitely given me more confidence to start splitting out a few certain monolithic applications where appropriate.

              (2 of 3 customers found this review helpful)

               
              5.0

              I absolutely recommend this book!

              By Vita

              from Prague, Czech Republic

              About Me Developer

              Verified Buyer

              Pros

              • Concise
              • Easy to understand
              • Helpful examples
              • Well-written

              Cons

                Best Uses

                • Expert
                • Intermediate
                • Novice

                Comments about oreilly Building Microservices:

                The book is full of great ideas and many of them apply not only to microservices. The approaches to various problems outlined in the book can successfully be used in general thrououth the software industry.

                (6 of 6 customers found this review helpful)

                 
                3.0

                Good introduction to microservices

                By mol

                from Australia

                About Me Architect, Developer

                Verified Reviewer

                Pros

                • Concise
                • Easy to understand

                Cons

                • Not comprehensive enough

                Best Uses

                • Novice
                • Student

                Comments about oreilly Building Microservices:

                I would recommend this book to people who are considering embarking on using micro services at scale for a company. The book touches on all aspects that needs consideration and as such a good checklist for problem spaces that needs to be addressed. It does this without wasting much time on 'fill' which is great but is straight to the point of what are the most widely known things to consider.

                If your company has already embarked on adopting microservices I would be surprised if you haven't already run into the aspects mentioned in the book and would (hopefully) already have come up with very similar learnings and/or approches as is described in the book.

                (2 of 2 customers found this review helpful)

                 
                5.0

                Well written, validated my assumptions

                By Space Ghost

                from Santa Barbara, CA

                Verified Buyer

                Comments about oreilly Building Microservices:

                This book validated the assumptions, designs and eventual direction I took when decomposing a classic Ruby on Rails monolithic application into a set of loosely-coupled, highly-coherent microservices.

                It is not an 'example' book by giving you code, it helps you pick the right directions in all areas of building and running modern Internet-based applications: design, scaling, testing, deployments, production and technical costs.

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