Docker: Up & Running
Shipping Reliable Containers in Production
Publisher: O'Reilly Media
Final Release Date: June 2015
Pages: 232

Updated to cover Docker version 1.10



Docker is quickly changing the way that organizations are deploying software at scale. But understanding how Linux containers fit into your workflow—and getting the integration details right—are not trivial tasks. With this practical guide, you’ll learn how to use Docker to package your applications with all of their dependencies, and then test, ship, scale, and support your containers in production.

Two Lead Site Reliability Engineers at New Relic share much of what they have learned from using Docker in production since shortly after its initial release. Their goal is to help you reap the benefits of this technology while avoiding the many setbacks they experienced.

  • Learn how Docker simplifies dependency management and deployment workflow for your applications
  • Start working with Docker images, containers, and command line tools
  • Use practical techniques to deploy and test Docker-based Linux containers in production
  • Debug containers by understanding their composition and internal processes
  • Deploy production containers at scale inside your data center or cloud environment
  • Explore advanced Docker topics, including deployment tools, networking, orchestration, security, and configuration
Table of Contents
Product Details
About the Author
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Customer Reviews

REVIEW SNAPSHOT®

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oreillyDocker: Up & Running
 
3.8

(based on 5 reviews)

Ratings Distribution

  • 5 Stars

     

    (0)

  • 4 Stars

     

    (4)

  • 3 Stars

     

    (1)

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80%

of respondents would recommend this to a friend.

Pros

  • Easy to understand (5)
  • Concise (3)

Cons

No Cons

Best Uses

  • Novice (5)
    • Reviewer Profile:
    • Developer (5)

Reviewed by 5 customers

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(5 of 6 customers found this review helpful)

 
3.0

Good only for the right audience

By Tom

from Nacka, Sweden

About Me Developer

Verified Reviewer

Pros

  • Easy to understand
  • Helpful examples

Cons

  • Lacks Information
  • Not comprehensive enough
  • Very Targeted

Best Uses

  • Intermediate
  • Novice

Comments about oreilly Docker: Up & Running:

This book is written with a very clear audience in mind. It is written as a hands on guide to the system administrator that is responsible to take in house developed software and deploy it as SaaS (software as a service) on a server farm. For this particular audience it is a good book. For this particular audience I would definitely recommend this book.

If you (like me) want to learn more about Docker to learn if/how you could use Docker for other tasks, this is not the correct book. There is useful information about Docker in the book, but it is not easily accessible as the book concentrates so much on deploying in house developed software as SaaS.

The first two chapters are just buzzwords and marketing jargon for Docker. The later chapters are much better. The book is well written, and the language used is easy to read.

 
4.0

Docker Philosophy

By TDDPirate

from Israel

About Me Developer

Verified Buyer

Pros

  • Easy to understand

Cons

    Best Uses

    • Novice

    Comments about oreilly Docker: Up & Running:

    Helped me wrap my head around Docker.
    Unlike other books about Docker, this book does not devote much space to information of interest only to DevOps people.

     
    4.0

    Really comprehensive guide on using Docker

    By Nenko

    from Sofia, Bulgaria

    About Me Developer

    Verified Reviewer

    Pros

    • Concise
    • Easy to understand
    • Well-written

    Cons

    • Kind Of Old Dated

    Best Uses

    • Novice

    Comments about oreilly Docker: Up & Running:

    I bought this book because I needed to get into Docker fast. I have read some stuff over the internet but I wasn't really "up and running" with the technology. This book filled all the gaps I had and covered topics that I didn't consider initially. As Docker is new technology and moves fast keep in mind that some of the used commands are deprecated but still useful.

    (1 of 1 customers found this review helpful)

     
    4.0

    Docker so well explained that it even turned me into a Docke

    By Just Jacek

    from Warsaw, Poland

    About Me Developer

    Verified Reviewer

    Pros

    • Accurate
    • Concise
    • Easy to understand
    • Well-written

    Cons

      Best Uses

      • Novice

      Comments about oreilly Docker: Up & Running:

      tl;dr Read the book "Docker: Up & Running" not the review and you regret no moment. Highly recommended! The only wish after "Docker: Up & Running" — the book should be a chapter or two longer!

      "Docker: Up & Running" was the first book I read about Docker itself and the entire Docker ecosystem. And, honestly, it's not a coincidence at all. O'Reilly has always amazed me how well organised their books were and the overall layout, chapters, fonts, material and authors have always been perfectly matched up. I expected no less from "Docker: Up and Running".

      I read O'Reilly's "Docker: Up & Running" from cover to cover and I regret no moment.

      I was an almost complete beginner in the space of Docker. "Almost" because I had already read up on Docker in the official documentation and in a couple of articles. I also met fantastic people (thanks Kamil!) who convinced me to spend far more time with the fantastic new technology. And it all happened in the year of Scala the programming language in my life when I promised myself to devote most of my professional time to Scala to get the gist of functional programming and other type-level tricks. Despite my age, 40+, I still think of myself more as a software developer that any other role in a development team. As luck would have it, the current project has drifted towards Docker to reap benefits of the promise of "continuous integration and deployment made easier with Docker". And so Docker turned into a very hot topic in the team. I had to catch up very quickly.

      And "Docker: Up & Running" moved me past that introductory level in a smooth and pleasant way!

      It worked out fabulously well that I even contributed my first images to build sbt — the Scala build tool — inside a Docker container (https://hub.docker.com/u/jaceklaskowski/) to have repeatable builds without expecting much from the build machine but Docker itself. I simply couldn't have imagined to have gotten more from the book. I think I can even explain Docker to others with ease (holding the book in my hands as a reference).

      It was in "Docker: Up & Running" when I finally understood why Docker could be so useful and fast at the same time (in no particular order) — a container is simply a process running on the Docker host. It was not obvious to me, but thanks to the book I could finally get it, too! And you can do all Docker remotely using command line or REST API. Thanks Karl and Sean for explaining it all in such an engaging and concisely manner.

      In "Docker: Up & Running" I found all I needed about Docker itself and the tooling around it, Swarm, Machine, Kubernetes, Amazon ECS including. The "tooling" part in which the tooling was explained was a bit flat so I have to look around for other books, but I finally know what I should be looking for instead of blindly picking material hoping to find the right one. The book guided me through the Docker ecosystem with enough details and paved the way to more advanced topics and tooling.

      Happily, the authors ran Docker on Mac OS so I was at home since I'm also on Mac. Linux is an obvious choice for Docker due to how Docker works, so it was covered as well. Not that much about Docker on Windows.
      I did find a couple of typos, but they're so minor that either you won't notice them or they're not going to diminish the value of the book in any way.

      Are you into Docker? Grab the book and spend a week of reading with "Docker: Up & Running"! You're surely going to miss it once over it.

      On to reading Packt's Learning Docker. The plan is to read up all the books available about Docker and develop my own understanding of its applicability in software development gigs of mine. What should be the reading path you'd recommend?

      (1 of 1 customers found this review helpful)

       
      4.0

      A concise and friendly introduction to Docker

      By Jascha

      from Barcelona

      About Me Developer

      Verified Reviewer

      Pros

      • Concise
      • Easy to understand
      • Helpful examples

      Cons

        Best Uses

        • Intermediate
        • Novice

        Comments about oreilly Docker: Up & Running:

        With more than a thousands contributors, and backed by colossi such as Google, Docker is by far this year's hottest topic and gained so much momentum that Amazon released containers' specific instances on AWS. Quite impressive, indeed, mainly considering it relies on technology that has been there, available to all of us, since years (Solaris jails anyone?). The revolution were not indeed the containers themeselves, but rather encapsulating the whole thing inside a blue smiling whale and making it easy for us all average human beings to take advantage of it and deploy containers with a couple of lines of code. Or less. In the last 12 months many books dedicated to Docker were released, confirming the interest of publishing companies in the business that moves around that whale. Good for us, since this means there is a lot to help us learn and get better! Among the books available is Docker: Up and Running, quite good pick for both enthusiasts and professionals that provides some very interesting material on advanced topics, mainly security.

        I have been reading this book during commute, on my way to work. I am honest, after reading the official documentation, so complete and easy to follow that it is such an indispensable resource for anyone willing to learn more about Docker, I was not expecting much from these tiny 200 pages. I must admit that, despite trying to find as many cons as possible, I have reached the back cover with my notebook plenty of positives notes and several code snippets that I will jealously keep somewhere safe. What stands out is how concise the book is: a paragraph, a concept. Plain and simple. The reader is gradually taken from the very basics up to advanced topics (more on this in a minute) smoothly, with no abrupt changes of subject. The abundance of colorful schemas definitely helps the reader getting a better, clearer picture of the subject being discussed. The examples are well explained and easy to follow.

        The best of the book is the part dedicated to security, no doubts. The authors dedicate lots of pages to make it clear that a container is just a process running on the host and that the root user in a container, is the root of the host itself, with all that comes with it. The risks and damages that creating containers with way too many privileges are both discussed and shown with plenty of examples. Tips are given to make containers safer and the world a better place.

        A couple of words about the many warnings that we find throughout the text: very often, when explaining the different features of Docker, and the internals that make it all happen, the authors come up with a box containing no more than three or four lines, very small pieces of wisdom with helpful suggestions to save the enthusiast from common pitfalls.

        To wrap it all up, a very good title for anyone interested in Docker, be it a DevOps or simply an enthusiast. While there are more user-friendly choices covering the basics (TURN), Docker: Up and Running is definitely suggested to anyone seriously interested in the blue whale, mainly for the chapters dedicated to security and the advanced topics in general.

        Suggested readings:
        The Docker Book: an user friendly, concise introduction to Docker. While it does not cover many advanced topics, it's by far the best covering the basics.
        Docker Hands on: while not helpful to beginners, it offers the reader many advanced topics that can't be found anywhere else.

        As usual, you can find more reviews on my personal blog: http://books.lostinmalloc.com. Feel free to pass by and share your thoughts!

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