Books & Videos

Table of Contents

  1. Context and Overview

    1. Chapter 1 A Network of Peers: Peer-to-Peer Models Through the History of the Internet

      1. A revisionist history of peer-to-peer (1969-1995)
      2. The network model of the Internet explosion (1995-1999)
      3. Observations on the current crop of peer-to-peer applications (2000)
      4. Peer-to-peer prescriptions (2001-?)
      5. Conclusions
    2. Chapter 2 Listening to Napster

      1. Resource-centric addressing for unstable environments
      2. Follow the users
      3. Where’s the content?
      4. Nothing succeeds like address, or, DNS isn’t the only game in town
      5. An economic rather than legal challenge
      6. Peer-to-peer architecture and second-class status
    3. Chapter 3 Remaking the Peer-to-Peer Meme

      1. From business models to meme maps
    4. Chapter 4 The Cornucopia of the Commons

      1. Ways to fill shared databases
  2. Projects

    1. Chapter 5 SETI@home

      1. Radio SETI
      2. How SETI@home works
      3. Trials and tribulations
      4. Human factors
      5. The world’s most powerful computer
      6. The peer-to-peer paradigm
    2. Chapter 6 Jabber: Conversational Technologies

      1. Conversations and peers
      2. Evolving toward the ideal
      3. Jabber is created
      4. Conclusion
    3. Chapter 7 Mixmaster Remailers

      1. A simple example of remailers
      2. Onion routing
      3. How Type 2 remailers differ from Type 1 remailers
      4. General discussion
    4. Chapter 8 Gnutella

      1. Gnutella in a gnutshell
      2. A brief history
      3. What makes Gnutella different?
      4. Gnutella’s communication system
      5. Organizing Gnutella
      6. Gnutella’s analogues
      7. Gnutella’s traffic problems
      8. The policy debates
      9. Gnutella’s effects
    5. Chapter 9 Freenet

      1. Requests
      2. Keys
      3. Conclusions
    6. Chapter 10 Red Rover

      1. Architecture
      2. Client life cycle
      3. Putting low-tech “weaknesses” into perspective
      4. Acknowledgments
    7. Chapter 11 Publius

      1. Why censorship-resistant anonymous publishing?
      2. System architecture
      3. Cryptography fundamentals
      4. Publius operations
      5. Publius implementation
      6. Publius MIME type
      7. Publius in a nutshell
    8. Chapter 12 Free Haven

      1. Privacy in data-sharing systems
      2. Anonymity for anonymous storage
      3. The design of Free Haven
      4. Attacks on Free Haven
      5. An analysis of anonymity
      6. Future work
      7. Conclusion
      8. Acknowledgments
  3. Technical Topics

    1. Chapter 13 Metadata

      1. Data about data
      2. Metadata lessons from the Web
      3. Resources and relationships: A historical overview
      4. Conclusion
    2. Chapter 14 Performance

      1. A note on terminology
      2. Why performance matters
      3. Bandwidth barriers
      4. It’s a small, small world
      5. Case study 1: Freenet
      6. Case study 2: Gnutella
      7. Conclusions
      8. Acknowledgments
    3. Chapter 15 Trust

      1. Trust in real life, and its lessons for computer networks
      2. Trusting downloaded software
      3. Trust in censorship-resistant publishing systems
      4. Third-party trust issues in Publius
      5. Trust in other systems
      6. Trust and search engines
      7. Conclusions
    4. Chapter 16 Accountability

      1. The difficulty of accountability
      2. Common methods for dealing with flooding and DoS attacks
      3. Micropayment schemes
      4. Reputations
      5. A case study: Accountability in Free Haven
      6. Conclusion
      7. Acknowledgments
    5. Chapter 17 Reputation

      1. Examples of using the Reputation Server
      2. Reputation domains, entities, and multidimensional reputations
      3. Identity as an element of reputation
      4. Interface to the marketplace
      5. Scoring system
      6. Reputation metrics
      7. Credibility
      8. Interdomain sharing
      9. Bootstrapping
      10. Long-term vision
      11. Central Reputation Server versus distributed Reputation Servers
      12. Summary
    6. Chapter 18 Security

      1. Groove versus email
      2. Why secure email is a failure
      3. The solution: A Groove shared space
      4. Security characteristics of a shared space
      5. Mutually-trusting shared spaces
      6. Mutually-suspicious shared spaces
      7. Shared space formation and trusted authentication
      8. Inviting people into shared spaces
      9. The New-Member-Added delta message
      10. Key versioning and key dependencies
      11. Central control and local autonomy
      12. Practical security for real-world collaboration
      13. Taxonomy of Groove keys
    7. Chapter 19 Interoperability Through Gateways

      1. Why unification?
      2. One network with a thousand faces
      3. Well-known networks and their roles
      4. Problems creating gateways
      5. Gateway implementation
      6. Existing projects
      7. Conclusion
      8. Acknowledgments
  4. Chapter 20 Afterword

    1. Precedents and parries

    2. Who gets to innovate?

    3. A clean sweep?

  1. Appendix Directory of Peer-to-Peer Projects

  2. Appendix Contributors