C++ In a Nutshell
A Desktop Quick Reference
Publisher: O'Reilly Media
Final Release Date: May 2003
Pages: 810

To-the-point, authoritative, no-nonsense solutions have always been a trademark of O'Reilly books. The In a Nutshell books have earned a solid reputation in the field as the well-thumbed references that sit beside the knowledgeable developer's keyboard. C++ in a Nutshell lives up to the In a Nutshell promise. C++ in a Nutshell is a lean, focused reference that offers practical examples for the most important, most often used, aspects of C++.C++ in a Nutshell packs an enormous amount of information on C++ (and the many libraries used with it) in an indispensable quick reference for those who live in a deadline-driven world and need the facts but not the frills.The book's language reference is organized first by topic, followed by an alphabetical reference to the language's keywords, complete with syntax summaries and pointers to the topic references. The library reference is organized by header file, and each library chapter and class declaration presents the classes and types in alphabetical order, for easy lookup. Cross-references link related methods, classes, and other key features. This is an ideal resource for students as well as professional programmers.When you're programming, you need answers to questions about language syntax or parameters required by library routines quickly. What, for example, is the C++ syntax to define an alias for a namespace? Just how do you create and use an iterator to work with the contents of a standard library container? C++ in a Nutshell is a concise desktop reference that answers these questions, putting the full power of this flexible, adaptable (but somewhat difficult to master) language at every C++ programmer's fingertips.

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oreillyC++ In a Nutshell
 
4.3

(based on 10 reviews)

Ratings Distribution

  • 5 Stars

     

    (5)

  • 4 Stars

     

    (4)

  • 3 Stars

     

    (0)

  • 2 Stars

     

    (1)

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75%

of respondents would recommend this to a friend.

Pros

  • Concise (4)
  • Accurate (3)
  • Helpful examples (3)
  • Well-written (3)

Cons

    Best Uses

    • Intermediate (4)
      • Reviewer Profile:
      • Developer (4)

    Reviewed by 10 customers

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    (3 of 3 customers found this review helpful)

     
    2.0

    Needs revison for C++11!

    By Vector

    from NY, NY

    About Me Designer, Developer

    Verified Reviewer

    Pros

    • Accurate
    • Concise
    • Easy to understand
    • Helpful examples
    • Well-written

    Cons

    • Outdated

    Best Uses

    • Intermediate

    Comments about oreilly C++ In a Nutshell:

    Like all the Nutshell books, this is an excellent, comprehensive reference that's easy to navigate.

    My complaint is that it really should be updated to for C++11 - if you buy it today (May 2014) you are buying an old and in many respects outdated book.

     
    5.0

    This book covers the 2003 standard

    By JMR

    from Ridgecrest,CA

    About Me Designer, Developer

    Verified Buyer

    Pros

    • Accurate
    • Concise
    • Helpful examples

    Cons

    • Needs Update For 2011 C

    Best Uses

    • Expert
    • Intermediate

    Comments about oreilly C++ In a Nutshell:

    This product covers all of the 2003 standard with very good detail of what the standard C++ should do.

    (3 of 3 customers found this review helpful)

     
    4.0

    O'Reilly RULES!

    By Juan Melendez from Eightminds[@]

    from Garfield, NJ

    About Me Developer, Sys Admin

    Verified Reviewer

    Pros

    • Accurate
    • Concise
    • Easy to understand
    • Helpful examples
    • Well-written

    Cons

      Best Uses

      • Intermediate
      • Novice
      • Student

      Comments about oreilly C++ In a Nutshell:

      Thank you - thank you - thank you O'Reily Media!!!

      I'm so happy to see that a few companies such as yourself "gets it". DRM eBooks are a disaster. I have purchased so many eBooks in the past that I can't use now because of one reason or other.

      Now I feel like when I purchase an eBook it truly is mine. You have won a loyal customer here!

      (1 of 2 customers found this review helpful)

       
      4.0

      A must have for any C++ Programmer

      By MrHacks

      from St. Louis, MO

      About Me Developer

      Verified Reviewer

      Pros

      • Concise
      • Well-written

      Cons

      • Not comprehensive enough

      Best Uses

      • Expert
      • Intermediate
      • Novice
      • Student

      Comments about oreilly C++ In a Nutshell:

      A concise book on everything that is in C++.

      (4 of 4 customers found this review helpful)

       
      4.0

      A concise and clear reference. Not an introduction

      By Anonymous

      from Undisclosed

      Comments about oreilly C++ In a Nutshell:

      This book is concise, readable, and useful. As it makes clear on the cover, this is a reference book, and dives straight into very intense details of the syntax of C++. It is meant as the kind of book you can check when code that you thought should work isn't compiling, or when you want to know the proper way to write something particular. In fact, it reads quite like a plain-English version of the C++ standard itself.

      It is perhaps surprising that the order of the chapters matches the abstraction level of each topic; starting with the parsing of characters in a source file, and working up through simple expressions to functions, classes, and finally to the standard libraries provided to assist you in common tasks. This may not be the order that the reader becomes interested in the topics, but it reflects the nature of this book as a reference rather than a cover-to-cover gripping read.

      Even that first chapter contains treasures, such as the importance of spaces in nested template declarations, where ">>" would be parsed incorrectly. As well as statements of fact about the language, it includes a few human touches like using words that most of us recognise ("source file", when the standard says "translation unit"), and even advice not to use trigraphs; an obsolete part of the language which is still valid. Later, it warns about the safety of iterators, which can become almost as invalid as pointers, but doesn't spend long on stylistic advice, a bit more of which might be welcome. It dwells more on templates and containers, perhaps because they are less familiar to many readers.

      There are lots of short examples of code, particularly in explaining how certain keywords are used and misused. There are cases where something might look like a type or a function; cases where a complicated pointer might be confusing about what it addresses, as well as more familiar cases about the scope of variables that might hide others of the same name. Again, these examples tend to be extremely short and to the point. There are a number of other examples of complete programs, covering a couple of pages, which have several classes with real functionality.

      There are a decent number of cross references to other chapters, and some of the same information is repeated in several places; for example the "language reference" (chapter 12) lists every reserved word, with a half page description of its purpose, and refers to related sections that cover the topic in more detail. There were still occasions when it took me longer to find the page I wanted, than I had hoped. Perhaps the style of the index and referencing will become more familiar with use.

      Seeing everything together, I was struck by how many innovative features are in the language, and most of them good. While Perl, Python, Java and the other languages we are familiar with have their own strengths (consider, for example, how Perl goes out of its way to let you write the same behaviour in many ways), and admitting that not everything in C++ is good (some people don't use exceptions for fear of ambiguity over resource ownership and clean-up), it was really inspiring to see what C++ has: multiple inheritance, virtual functions, exceptions, templates, dynamic casting, operator overloading, the standard library, namespaces, and so on.

      By far the largest part of the book is the standard library reference, which is a good thing. The author is obviously pleased with this, and devotes more than half of the pages to explaining each function. Languages live or die by the capabilities (and elegance) of what comes "in the box". Edinburgh University's ML was an interesting-ish thing to study, but didn't help much when you wanted to interact with the real world. PHP is a cute language for web designers who think they can program, but its library is shockingly haphazard and incomplete. The C++ standard library is remarkable in its wealth of templates for storing data. Containers, iterators, maps, vectors, and the various other methods are covered with delight, encouraging you to get on with programming your new algorithms, instead of reimplementing Donald Knuth's. It also includes all of the C standard library, and various new methods, too.

      In summary, this book is a good volume to have on the shelf for those occasions when your C++ compiler answers back about your syntax for subtle language features, and good to have on your desk when you want to use the standard library. Personally, I would have liked a bit more advice about what is efficient, or what is risky. It is very clearly and concisely written, which is a great benefit. Overall, a marked success.

      (1 of 1 customers found this review helpful)

       
      4.0

      C++ In a Nutshell

      By Anonymous

      from Undisclosed

      Comments about oreilly C++ In a Nutshell:

      The book "C++ In a Nutshell" by Ray Lischner is recommended for users who are already familiar with the C++ language, its style, and coding conventions. Although the first third of the book deals with the basics of the language, users who are new to C++ will find themselves looking for a more tutorial-like reference when trying out features for the first time; to the book's credit, most subject areas are methodically touched upon but often additional explanations and examples would be useful.

      For more experienced programmers, the book can be a source of a wealth of information and can be a big time saver. A whole chapter designated as a language reference allows for quick lookup of obscure C++ constructs. Here, the spirit of the book is captured perfectly as syntax summaries are given using a modified BNF. Probably the most useful part of the book is the library reference that provides complete descriptions of all the classes in the C++ standard library. This section itself is likely to save one from spending hours on googling for small bits of information.

      Thus, for those new to C++ something like "Practical C++ Programming" by Steve Oualline would likely provide a more useful introduction to the language. However, for those with the experience to know what they are looking for "C++ In a Nutshell" is a very good reference.

       
      5.0

      The best, most indispensable compact" reference!"

      By Anonymous

      from Undisclosed

      Comments about oreilly C++ In a Nutshell:

      This is a wonderful reference that absolutely deserves a space on your shelf right next to Stroustrop's White Book. I own very few books with such clear and informative descriptions of both advanced and "basic" language features. Highly useful.

       
      5.0

      C++ in a Nutshell Review

      By Stewart Behymer Pensacola LUG

      from Undisclosed

      Comments about oreilly C++ In a Nutshell:

      The C++ in a Nutshell book by O'Reilly gives the reader all the information he or she may need to utilize the powerful and complex C++ language. The book is broken into two main sections. The first section covers the language of C++. The second section is a library reference.

      Section one does not give examples of nuance of the C++ language but it is not suppose to since it is a Nutshell book. However, it does an excellent job of covering the language and providing examples for the most used aspects of C++. The Nutshell series has always been a resource in which you can find answers quickly.

      The second section is the library reference. This section helped me tremendously because I have not memorized nor do I intend to memorize all the class definitions and member functions. The C++ in a Nutshell book is an invaluable reference that sits on my desk all times. Whether you are making a living at programming C++ or simply a person interested in the C++ language the C++ in a Nutshell is a must have.

       
      5.0

      C++ in a Nutshell Review

      By anomuous

      from Undisclosed

      Comments about oreilly C++ In a Nutshell:

      My long waited book on C++ from O'Reilly. It's more concise, examples are easier to trace and understand than Java in a Nutshell. For C++ is a extremelly difficult and complex language, I think it's currently the best book you can find for simple C++ algorithum and comprhensive reference on the market.

      I hope the future versions could have further remarks/explainations, on the code expamples for the code logic. It can help beginners like me to understand the code examples easier.

       
      5.0

      C++ in a Nutshell Review

      By Don Kim

      from Undisclosed

      Comments about oreilly C++ In a Nutshell:

      While not a tutorial, it is definetely an excellent reference book to have around when your stuck on a problem with C++, and need a quick look up and refresher. Plus, unlike the tomes you'd typically use for heavy duty references, this is small enough that you can carry it in your backpack when your away from the office... a great "pocket dictionary" for c++.

      I highly recommend it!

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