Learning Unix for Mac OS X Panther
Publisher: O'Reilly Media
Final Release Date: December 2003
Pages: 192

Renowned for its friendliness, Mac OS® X has delighted many a loyal Mac® user with its combined ease use and underlying strength. By no means simplistic, its intelligently designed operating system and user interface boast of sophistication and power, while still offering accessibility to even the most inexperienced computer users. But Mac OS X has gone one step further: it's turned unsuspecting Mac users into Unix® users, too.Perhaps you're already familiar with Unix, just not on the Mac. Or perhaps you opened your Utilities folder, spotted the Terminal icon and double-clicked on it just to see what it does. Suddenly faced with a command line interface, you may have asked, "What does this mean?" followed by the most pressing question, "Why on earth would I ever want to venture into this seemingly user-unfriendly territory?"The new edition of Learning Unix for Mac OS X Panther answers these questions and more. This compact book provides a user-friendly tour for the uninitiated of the Mac's Unix base. You can safely explore Terminal and familiarize yourself with the command line, learning as you go about the hundreds of Unix programs that come with your Mac. You'll begin to understand the power and flexibility of Unix. And if Unix isn't new to you, you'll discover how it translates into this latest Mac incarnation. Updated to cover Mac OS X Panther (Mac OS X 10.3), this book will keep you current with the latest features of your Mac.Learning Unix for Mac OS X Panther begins with a quick but in-depth introduction to Terminal and the command line interface. All the common commands are simply explained with accompanying examples, exercises, and opportunities for experimentation. There are even problem checklists to help you along the way if you get stuck. You'll learn how to:

  • Customize your shell environment
  • Manage files and directories
  • Successfully print from the Unix command line
  • Edit and create files with the vi editor
  • Perform remote logins
  • Access Internet functions, and much more
Unix continues to thrive as an operating system because of its power, flexibility, and simplicity, and the vast community that supports it. Mac OS X Panther makes it possible for you to run Unix programs side-by-side with native Mac programs on your Mac desktop. Learning Unix for Mac OS X Panther puts the power of these programs at your fingertips.
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oreillyLearning Unix for Mac OS X Panther
 
3.0

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4.0

bash isn't necessarily the default shell

By Anonymous

from Undisclosed

Comments about oreilly Learning Unix for Mac OS X Panther:

In general this book is quite good. Matisse Enzer's Peachpit title "Unix on OS X" (or something like that) would be a good companion.

I wasn't too thrilled with the organization of the content: customizing your shell and editing environment variables seems like appendix material for the kind of user this book is geared to, not Chapter 1 contents. And an entire chapter on printing seems a bit much; new Unix users are almost certainly going to be printing using the good old Mac UI.

And one little gotcha that turned out to be quite important for me: bash is not the default shell in Panther if you've upgraded from Jaguar as I did. In that case tcsh is. Might be worth including this in future editions (although I guess there will be fewer and fewer of us upgraders as time goes on...)

 
4.0

Learning Unix for Mac OS X Panther Review

By Brian Jepson

from Undisclosed

Comments about oreilly Learning Unix for Mac OS X Panther:

(posted in response to another review)

Ed, I'm very sorry that the book disappointed you. However, I'd ask you to give it another chance, but be sure to think about the goals of the book that are spelled out on the back cover (see http://www.oreilly.com/catalog/lunixpanther/desc.html). I really do think we accomplished the goals that we set out to with this book, although it sounds like it's not what you were looking for. As far as the coverage of sudo, please see p12, 48, and 54-55, where we have a section on the command. I'm sorry that you missed that the first time through, but please do give this book another look. Or, if this just isn't the book for you, you may want to look at Mac OS X Panther for Unix Geeks, which will be out soon. This one goes a lot further than the Learning Unix book.

 
1.0

Learning Unix for Mac OS X Panther Review

By Ed Crelin

from Undisclosed

Comments about oreilly Learning Unix for Mac OS X Panther:

Other than terminal session telecommunications 18 years ago I have had no real terminal type training and was anticipating an introduction to the terminal and some useful UNIX commands for everyday use in OS X. I am sorry to report that while this book does a good job introducing you to the terminal, that's all it really does. Doing things like reading your email in the terminal is something so arcane that no mac user would do more than once as a silly test. Too much space devoted to it and other silly things. The title is Learning Unix for OS X, not "a couple generic UNIX commands" I was hoping for a handbook, a reference list of basic useful commands for REAL OS X needs. I will give you a perfect example. Every OS X user has heard of permissions and many have experienced the need to fix them. Most people don't know that you can do it in Disk Utility and download applications (some free, most not) that will do it. I have since learned (from another source) the ridiculously simple commands that will envoke disk utility to do it (using the 'sudo' command that isn't even in the book, c'mon) without opening windows and pushing buttons. I don't want to diminish the author of the utility Cocktail's profits but users can do everything that program does easily using the terminal. That would be "Learning UNIX for OS X". I would rethink the content, leave out the stuff no one would ever use and add some realworld goodies. This is effectively chapter one, I was done in twenty minutes, and $20. is too much, I expected a wee bit more from O'Reilly.

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