Getting Started with Arduino
Publisher: O'Reilly Media
Released: February 2009
Pages: 128

This valuable little book offers a thorough introduction to the open-source electronics prototyping platform that's taking the design and hobbyist world by storm. Getting Started with Arduino gives you lots of ideas for Arduino projects and helps you get going on them right away. From getting organized to putting the final touches on your prototype, all the information you need is right in the book.

Inside, you'll learn about:



  • Interaction design and physical computing
  • The Arduino hardware and software development environment
  • Basics of electricity and electronics
  • Prototyping on a solderless breadboard
  • Drawing a schematic diagram


And more. With inexpensive hardware and open-source software components that you can download free, getting started with Arduino is a snap. To use the introductory examples in this book, all you need is a USB Arduino, USB A-B cable, and an LED.

Join the tens of thousands of hobbyists who have discovered this incredible (and educational) platform. Written by the co-founder of the Arduino project, with illustrations by Elisa Canducci, Getting Started with Arduino gets you in on the fun! This 128-page book is a greatly expanded follow-up to the author's original short PDF that's available on the Arduino website.
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oreillyGetting Started with Arduino
 
4.5

(based on 6 reviews)

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100%

of respondents would recommend this to a friend.

Pros

  • Easy to understand (3)

Cons

    Best Uses

    • Novice (3)
      • Reviewer Profile:
      • Educator (3)

    Reviewed by 6 customers

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    5.0

    Missing link found!

    By Doctor G

    from Newfoundland, Canada

    About Me Educator, Maker

    Verified Buyer

    Pros

    • Accurate
    • Easy to understand
    • Helpful examples
    • Well-written

    Cons

      Best Uses

      • Novice
      • Student

      Comments about oreilly Getting Started with Arduino:

      I have been ordering and assembling Arduino projects for over a year but always found that the instructions assumed you had experience with arduino. Even the "instructional kits" were not really meant for a beginner. This book "Getting Started with Arduino", was the missing link I needed.
      I would recommend this book to anyone planning on learning this stuff!
      Thanks,
      D Young
      Instructor

       
      5.0

      This book will be of good benefit.

      By gel_fh

      from Dh., KSA

      About Me Educator

      Verified Buyer

      Pros

      • Easy to understand

      Cons

        Best Uses

        • Intermediate

        Comments about oreilly Getting Started with Arduino:

        The book is so easy to understand. I can definitely make use of it for many projects and experiments. Good book to keep as one of the electronic book collections.

         
        4.0

        Good Book

        By waterlubber

        from USA

        Verified Reviewer

        Pros

        • Accurate
        • Concise
        • Helpful examples
        • Useful

        Cons

        • Missing some information
        • Too basic

        Best Uses

        • Intermediate
        • Novice

        Comments about oreilly Getting Started with Arduino:

        Good book. The index in the back helps, but its missing that one thing...

        (1 of 4 customers found this review helpful)

         
        5.0

        A must for cutting high tech teeth

        By Woodee

        from PDX

        About Me Designer, Developer, Educator, Maker

        Verified Reviewer

        Pros

        • Easy to understand
        • Well-written

        Cons

          Best Uses

          • Novice
          • Student

          Comments about oreilly Getting Started with Arduino:

          My seven-year-old will soon be diving into the world of higher tech with this and a few other books. Great intro to electronics and automation.

          I bought multiple copies to give as presents.

          Happy Holidays!

          (4 of 5 customers found this review helpful)

           
          4.0

          Good Beginner

          By SGNB221

          from Undisclosed

          Comments about oreilly Getting Started with Arduino:

          Getting Started with Arduino is a good way to do just that. The book gives a good basic tutorial on electrical circuits, troubleshooting, and programming. It is focused on the practical application of those fields and doesn't cover with much depth the concepts of those fields.However, it does give enough information for a beginner to produce and expand upon circuits and gives the experienced a good introduction to use the Arduino system in their projects. All in all this is a good beginning book for anyone, especially young ones, to get started with Arduino.

          (34 of 35 customers found this review helpful)

           
          4.0

          Getting Started with Arduino

          By Eric

          from Undisclosed

          Comments about oreilly Getting Started with Arduino:

          This book is an introduction to the open-source electronics prototyping platform known as Arduino. Arduino is a single-board computer that can be the basis for interactive electronics projects like art installations, interactive environments, and appliance controls. A project is created by connecting different sensors, LEDs, motors, etc. to the board. Software programs can then be written in the Arduino programming language running on a host computer (Windows, Mac OS X, or Linux) and uploaded via USB. The book is less than 120 pages and is a quick read, but serves as a perfect entrance to the Arduino world of programming and to the growing Arduino community on the World Wide Web. An Arduino board can be built from the open-source schematics available on the Arduino website (http://arduino.cc/) or can be purchased pre-assembled (for less than $40 USD) from one of the many vendors available.

          The book's back cover states that the reader will learn about several topics, like interaction design, physical computing as well as the basics of electricity and electronics. While this is true to a point, some of the most compelling material in the book is Mr. Banzi's explanation of the mindset from which Arduino grew and which surrounds it now. I enjoyed his stories about taking apart different things as a child and some of his experiences with different technology. I remember wanting a "50-in-1 Electronics Kit" from RadioShack that never seemed to materialize under the Christmas tree, despite countless reminders to my parents over the course of several years. With Arduino, there is no upper limit to the number of projects possible. As Mr. Banzi says, the word that best captures the spirit of Arduino and this type of new media is "tinkering" and it is the tinkerer's willingness to start on a particular journey without a goal, but with the willingness to play, plain and simple, with the attached components, that yields the most interesting results. An improvisatory approach to the creation of projects is further underscored by the convention of referring to Arduino projects as "sketches." Mr. Banzi's passion for the subject matter comes shining through.

          There are only a handful of actual projects in the book and they range in complexity from periodically lighting an LED to the more bizarre but elegant project of using a WWW newsfeed to control a lamp. However, even in the simpler examples, the book explores the mindset necessary to deal with the various analog and digital inputs and outputs of the Arduino board. In fact, the reader is shown how to "think" like the board to further their own project development.

          The book assumes the reader can find their way around a computer with some ease. One can type in the programming examples or can in fact download them from the Makezine.com website. Most people who would be interested in this topic are probably well versed in electronics or computers and would not find it too daunting. There are only a few errata on the O'Reilly website. I found only one point in the book where I would have formatted it differently. This is during the explanation of the setup for computer drivers for Windows and Mac OS X (there is no such coverage for Linux). The last two paragraphs on page 24 are under the driver setup for Windows, when in fact they are applicable to both operating systems. I was paying attention mostly to the Mac OS X instructions and was surprised to find on page 25 that the Arduino interactive development environment (IDE) had already been launched, but I hadn't been instructed to do so.

          This book is certainly worth the price and would probably be passed on to a friend once a little experience with the development paradigm has been gained. There are countless programs, free examples and documentation of other user projects on the WWW. Also, the vendors listed on the Arduino website have more challenging peripheral components one can explore or that can provide inspiration for further projects.

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