C# 3.0 in a Nutshell, 3rd Edition
A Desktop Quick Reference
Publisher: O'Reilly Media
Final Release Date: September 2007
Pages: 864

This is a concise yet thorough reference to C# 3.0 programming as implemented in Microsoft's Visual Studio 2008. C# 3.0 in a Nutshell gets right to the point, covering the essentials of language syntax and usage as well as the parts of the .NET base class libraries you need to build working applications. But unlike earlier editions, this book is now organized entirely around concepts and use cases, providing greater depth and readability.

C# 3.0 introduces the most significant enhancements yet to the programming language, and C# 3.0 in a Nutshell delves deep into the subject while assuming minimal prior knowledge of C#-making it accessible to anyone with a reasonable background in programming. In addition to the language, the book covers the .NET CLR and the core Framework assemblies, along with the unified querying syntax called Language Integrated Query (LINQ), which bridges the traditional divide between programs and their data sources.

Free of clutter and long introductions, this book provides a map of C# 3.0 knowledge in a succinct and unified style:

  • Opening chapters concentrate purely on C#, starting with the basics of syntax, types and variables, and finishing with advanced topics such as unsafe code and preprocessor directives


  • Later chapters cover the core .NET 3.5 Framework, including such topics as LINQ, XML, collections, I/O and networking, memory management, reflection, attributes, security, threading, application domains and native interoperability


Designed as a handbook for daily use, C# 3.0 in a Nutshell is an ideal companion to any of the vast array of books that focus on an applied technology such as WPF, ASP.NET, or WCF. The areas of the language and .NET Framework that such books omit, this one covers in detail.
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oreillyC# 3.0 in a Nutshell, 3rd Edition
 
5.0

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(5 of 5 customers found this review helpful)

 
5.0

My go to book for C#.

By TD Hall

from Undisclosed

Comments about oreilly C# 3.0 in a Nutshell, 3rd Edition:

Absolutly the best C# book for an experienced programmer. It is all info, no fluff. It is my go to book for C#. If you are frustrated with Microsofts "help" system, then this book is for you.

Thanks to the authors and to O'Reilly for putting this book out!

(2 of 2 customers found this review helpful)

 
5.0

C# 3.0 in a Nutshell

By leve

from Undisclosed

Comments about oreilly C# 3.0 in a Nutshell, 3rd Edition:

Very-very solid book. I'm a seasoned C# developer and I found a lot of interestig topicks while reading this book. And it is right to the point. I recommend it to beginners as well as advanced programers.

(2 of 2 customers found this review helpful)

 
5.0

Best book ever!

By alex

from Undisclosed

Comments about oreilly C# 3.0 in a Nutshell, 3rd Edition:

I am a supposedly advanced developer MCSD, 10 years experience and this was easily the best book I have seen ever! Ok maybe not as fun as 100 years of solitude but...The examples really help with understanding concepts which I should understand but was maybe a little hazy about, oops, and helped me learn lots of the new stuff really quickly. Great book and let me know when the boys write anything again!

(3 of 3 customers found this review helpful)

 
5.0

Stellar c# 3.0 Reference

By Alan Sheats

from Undisclosed

Comments about oreilly C# 3.0 in a Nutshell, 3rd Edition:

For intermediate to advanced developers looking for a comprehensive reference to C# 3.0, Joseph and Ben Albahari's new book C# 3.0 in a Nutshell, 3rd ed. (O'Reilly September 2007, ISBN-10: 0-596-52757-8) is the perfect source. Completely rewritten for C# 3.0 and Linq, the Albaharis' book dives in deep and provides details not found elsewhere. At the same time, the book maintains a sharp and clear focus on C#, the CLR and the core Framework assemblies.

The authors also make it very clear from the outset that the book is not a tutorial on C#, but rather intended as a desktop reference for experienced programmers. Neither does the book skim the new .NET applied technologies, such as WPF, WCF and ASP.NET AJAX. Instead, it is assumed that the reader interested in such subjects will refer to one of the many in-depth books available on these technologies.

After a brief introductory chapter on C# and its relation to the .NET framework, there are three chapters totaling about 150 pages on C# Basics, Creating Types in C# and Advanced C# covering the essential language elements in the clear, concise and insightful style that is the authors' hallmark. Coverage of advanced C# features includes anonymous types, lambda expressions and extension methods, all of which were introduced with C# 3.0. This section ends with an excellent presentation of XML documentation, a subject often neglected or poorly presented in other C# books.

The next two chapters provide an overview of the .NET framework and core assemblies with forward references to more detailed information in subsequent chapters. The focus here is on the mscorlib, System, System.Core and System.XML assemblies, but the book includes a complete mapping of all framework namespaces to assemblies as an appendix that alone is nearly worth the price of the book. These two relatively short framework chapters do an excellent job of documenting the differences between 1.0, 1.1, 2.0, 3.0 and 3.5 versions of the framework and the corresponding versions of C# and the CLR. The Framework Fundamentals chapter also covers the core .NET types String and DateTime, as well as the basic numeric types. Here you will find detailed descriptions of formatting and parsing of these types with numerous code examples and several comprehensive tables that serve as an excellent quick reference for these mundane but necessary programming tasks.

Three chapters on Linq (Linq Queries, Linq Operators and Linq to XML) are preceded by a chapter on Collections and followed by a chapter on Other XML Technologies. These chapters are where the book really shines, and the presentation of Linq is simply brilliant. After the introduction in previous chapters to extension methods and lambda expressions on which Linq is based, the authors go into some detail on generic iterators as part of setting the stage for Linq queries. Unlike other books covering generics, C# 3.0 in a Nutshell goes into some detail about the mechanics of generic iterators and emphasize the importance of C# 2.0 generics as the foundation for Linq and the IEnumerable and IQueryable interfaces on which Linq queries are based. With this solid foundation, Linq becomes as simple and elegant as its designers intended. Readers will also be delighted by the LinqPad utility available on the authors' website, which supports direct entry of queries in C# or SQL and includes some 200 queries from the book for hands-on exploration and learning.

Another solid section of the book consists of three chapters on Streams+I/O, Networking and Serialization. Each of these chapters explains its subject in a comprehensive yet cohesive manner in which the overall architecture is presented first in diagrams and tables that clearly show the relationships between the various classes. The various streams, network pipes and serialization engines are then presented in order with many illustrative examples and quick-reference tables that developers will find much easier to use than searching through volumes of online documentation in Visual Studio.

The final chapters of the book cover what are normally considered advanced topics, such as Assemblies, Reflection, Threading, Asynchronous Methods, AppDomains and Native Interop. As in previous chapters, the authors do not skim these subjects but dive deep. Each topic is presented in detailed yet very concise descriptions as would be expected from authors who are true experts and have taken the time to get under the hood and examine closely how everything works. Regrettably, the authors were not able to include material on COM Interop from the previous edition of the book, but these chapters are available on their website, where a draft version of the chapter on multi-threading can also be downloaded.

C# 3.0 takes a giant step forward in the evolution of the language, with Linq arguably the most fundamental change to date, moving C# closer to functional programming languages such as Haskell and F#. C# 3.0 in a Nutshell will make even experienced C# programmers see the language in a new light and hopefully instill greater respect for C# and .NET in developers coming from other platforms. For many developers who like myself feel that there is still much yet to learn in C#/.NET 2.0, the step up to C# 3.0 may seem daunting. Make no mistake about it, however, the release of C# 3.0 and Linq will mark a sea change that will sweep all of us with it over time.

For those who want a solid reference for C# 3.0 today, there is no better choice than C# 3.0 in a Nutshell. For me, it almost immediately became an indispensible reference. At nearly 850 pages, C# 3.0 in a Nutshell is certainly not a pocket reference, but it is definitely a book that every serious C# developer would do well to have close at hand.

(1 of 1 customers found this review helpful)

 
5.0

Excellent job!

By Arify

from Undisclosed

Comments about oreilly C# 3.0 in a Nutshell, 3rd Edition:

Best C# book in the market! I've been reading it since the very early RoughCuts version. I've own over 50 C# books and this one is simply the best. Covers a lot of advanced development topics and its straight to the point.

Excellent job!

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