Java: The Good Parts
Publisher: O'Reilly Media
Final Release Date: April 2010
Pages: 196

What if you could condense Java down to its very best features and build better applications with that simpler version? In this book, veteran Sun Labs engineer Jim Waldo reveals which parts of Java are most useful, and why those features make Java among the best programming languages available.

Every language eventually builds up crud, Java included. The core language has become increasingly large and complex, and the libraries associated with it have grown even more. Learn how to take advantage of Java's best features by working with an example application throughout the book. You may not like some of the features Jim Waldo considers good, but they'll actually help you write better code.

  • Learn how the type system and packages help you build large-scale software
  • Use exceptions to make code more reliable and easier to maintain
  • Manage memory automatically with garbage collection
  • Discover how the JVM provides portability, security, and nearly bug-free code
  • Use Javadoc to embed documentation within the code
  • Take advantage of reusable data structures in the collections library
  • Use Java RMI to move code and data in a distributed network
  • Learn how Java concurrency constructs let you exploit multicore processors
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O'Reilly MediaJava: The Good Parts
 
3.0

(based on 3 reviews)

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(4 of 9 customers found this review helpful)

 
1.0

Lear Baseball - the easy way

By Ormus

from San Jose, CA

Verified Reviewer

Comments about O'Reilly Media Java: The Good Parts:

Out of all the models in the world, you can relay on, you chose... baseball!!!
So now, I need to first learn and understand baseball in order to have a sense of the samples in this book.

(8 of 11 customers found this review helpful)

 
3.0

Strange book

By Bruno

from Grenoble, France

About Me Designer, Developer

Verified Reviewer

Pros

  • Concise
  • Easy to understand
  • Well-written

Cons

  • Too basic

Best Uses

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  • Intermediate
  • Novice
  • Student

Comments about O'Reilly Media Java: The Good Parts:

What is the purpose of the book ?

This book seems to be totally in opposition to the current trend of new languages trying to overcome the Java's shortcoming: Scala, XTend, Ceylon ...
He goes back to the rationale that guided Java to show that there was no mistakes in its conception. Which, I reckon, was true ... by the time. Indeed it solved the problems they had ... and it is still working today. But things - and people - change. Java didn't evolve fast enough and obviously also because of its success suffer a lot of criticisms.

I feel that the book is partly a reaction to this wave of criticisms.

But I am not sure if Java developers have turn their back to Java to the point where they need to be reminded of the fundamentals: why exception are useful, packages, Javadoc ... But OK, it is still nice for neophytes to discover the "Good Parts" indeed!
On the other hand, if the goal is to say that Java is not that bad, there is no need to write a book. Nobody refutes its success.

Yet when he states that RMI and concurrency are well handled in Java, it is hard to agree. The need for higher abstractions is clear. Java itself evolves (slowly) in this direction.

So I not always agree, but its point of view is interesting and even unconventional. Besides it is a quick read.

I would still recommend it: either as a quick and curious book for experts or as a good outline for neophytes.

(6 of 7 customers found this review helpful)

 
5.0

Insights and tips from a Pioneer

By Peter Firmstone

from Australia

About Me Designer, Developer

Verified Reviewer

Pros

  • Accurate
  • Concise
  • Easy to understand
  • Helpful examples
  • Well-written

Cons

    Best Uses

    • Expert
    • Intermediate
    • Novice
    • Student

    Comments about O'Reilly Media Java: The Good Parts:

    Jim Waldo, a pioneer of distributed computing, shares stories, benefits and pitfalls behind the fundamental design decisions and features of Java, after years of researching some of computing's most difficult problems.

    I highly recommend following Jim's advise on API design using interfaces, this is especially relevant today, he provides helpful suggestions and hints regarding concurrency, RMI, serialization and generics.

    Jim has some very good references for the reader to follow up on too.

    I'm a developer on the Apache River project, which is a continuation of one of Jim's children, Jini. The book doesn't talk much about Jini, but anyone using Jini or Apache River will benefit as much as any Java developer.

    Recommended reading, despite the plethora of Java books available, you won't find this information elsewhere.

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