HTML5: Up and Running
Dive into the Future of Web Development
Publisher: O'Reilly Media
Released: August 2010
Pages: 222

If you don't know about the new features available in HTML5, now's the time to find out. This book provides practical information about how and why the latest version of this markup language will significantly change the way you develop for the Web.

HTML5 is still evolving, yet browsers such as Safari, Mozilla, Opera, and Chrome already support many of its features -- and mobile browsers are even farther ahead. HTML5: Up & Running carefully guides you though the important changes in this version with lots of hands-on examples, including markup, graphics, and screenshots. You'll learn how to use HTML5 markup to add video, offline capabilities, and more -- and you’ll be able to put that functionality to work right away.

  • Learn new semantic elements, such as <header>, <footer>, and <section>
  • Meet Canvas, a 2D drawing surface you can program with JavaScript
  • Embed video in your web pages without third-party plugins
  • Use Geolocation to let web application visitors share their physical location
  • Take advantage of local storage capacity that goes way beyond cookies
  • Build offline web applications that work after network access is disconnected
  • Learn about several new input types for web forms
  • Create your own custom vocabularies in HTML5 with microdata
Table of Contents
Product Details
About the Author
Colophon
Recommended for You
Customer Reviews

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by PowerReviews
O'Reilly MediaHTML5: Up and Running
 
4.0

(based on 28 reviews)

Ratings Distribution

  • 5 Stars

     

    (10)

  • 4 Stars

     

    (13)

  • 3 Stars

     

    (2)

  • 2 Stars

     

    (1)

  • 1 Stars

     

    (2)

88%

of respondents would recommend this to a friend.

Pros

  • Easy to understand (22)
  • Helpful examples (20)
  • Well-written (17)
  • Concise (14)
  • Accurate (12)

Cons

  • Not comprehensive enough (5)
  • Too basic (3)

Best Uses

  • Intermediate (21)
  • Novice (12)
  • Expert (9)
  • Student (7)
    • Reviewer Profile:
    • Developer (24), Designer (8), Educator (3), Sys admin (3)

Reviewed by 28 customers

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1.0

Poor writing style

By Jeff

from W. Australia

About Me Developer, Sys Admin

Verified Buyer

Pros

    Cons

    • Not comprehensive enough
    • Too basic
    • Too many errors

    Best Uses

    • Door stop

    Comments about O'Reilly Media HTML5: Up and Running:

    The preview chapter I read looked and read well. It's a shame the remaining chapters didn't match up. I found a lack of detail and examples that seemed to start half way through the example and left far too much for you to follow up with later. Several of the examples didn't work I suspect because he didn't start at the beginning and left far too much for you to guess at.

    (1 of 1 customers found this review helpful)

     
    5.0

    This book is clearly a labor of love.

    By Pedro J.

    from New York, NY

    About Me Developer, Web Architect

    Pros

    • Accurate
    • Concise
    • Easy to understand
    • Helpful examples
    • Well-written

    Cons

    • A Little Dated Now

    Best Uses

    • Intermediate
    • Novice
    • Student

    Comments about O'Reilly Media HTML5: Up and Running:

    This is a fantastic introduction to HTML5. I can tell that each chapter is carefully crafted to be informative yet fun. There is a little repetitiveness but that's because the sections are meant to stand alone, without assuming you've read much before it. If you are looking for an advanced HTML5 book, this is not it. But if you didn't know what "Up And Running" means, let me be clear that it means "getting started" or "not advanced" (as some negative reviews seemed to be expecting). If you are new to HTML 5, this is an awesome book to start with.

    I personally hate the opening history lessons in most tech books, and this book has an opening history lesson but it was a great read; it put you right there with the players defining HTML back when browsers were just sprouting up in public and rooted developments today to those conversations years ago. "Shipped code wins," I paraphrase.

    The book does not cover everything in HTML 5 but what it does cover is done very well. So easy you read you'll read through the whole thing before you know it. I particularly enjoyed the video and audio section that not only goes over the tag but also walks the reader through how to get their videos ready for viewing in HTML 5 browsers; it's an HTML 5 book, not a video encoding book; Mark didn't need to do that, but he did and I thank him for it. For those complaining that the book is not comprehensive enough, please keep in mind that this was finished mid-2010; most of the missing items were not fully baked and documented by then.

    That being said, the book is showing signs of aging. I can only pray that Mark Pilgrim will come back from his self-imposed exile and spread the gospel once again.

    (1 of 3 customers found this review helpful)

     
    1.0

    Disappointed

    By Nicolas Steinmetz

    from France

    About Me Developer

    Verified Reviewer

    Pros

      Cons

      • Not Adapted
      • Too basic
      • Verbose When Unnecessary

      Best Uses

        Comments about O'Reilly Media HTML5: Up and Running:

        Most of the book consists in showing how the Modernizr community can detect if your browser supports the different features of HTML5 at least for the first 100 pages, after a long story on how HTLM5 is born.

        Even if the 2nd half is more interesting, I would not recommend the book (especially nowadays with more litterature over html5 exists).

        (1 of 2 customers found this review helpful)

         
        4.0

        Promising in HTML5: the canvas and video

        By aleman-meza

        from Houston, TX

        About Me Developer, Educator

        Verified Reviewer

        Pros

        • Easy to understand
        • Small-size

        Cons

          Best Uses

          • Expert

          Comments about O'Reilly Media HTML5: Up and Running:

          The author tells you why HTML5 took for ever to come out. Then, it starts from the simple elements that now have a shorter syntax and new semantic elements that are intended to specify that a web page has articles, sections, header and footer. It always tell you why something exists, which is very helpful as compared to just providing examples with their respective screen shots as other books do or as you would get from finding the examples yourself searching online.

          The book will not disappoint you but the support of HTML5 may do so, depending on what you want to really do. For example, it seems too much work to get different versions of a video in order to make it work in most web browsers. It is not a problem of HTML5, it is a problem of lack of agreement among Web browsers and of patents behind (most of) video codecs. The new elements for forms are the best example of lack of browser support on elements that, after a decade, you would imagine would be standard components by now. The microdata elements, actually, attributes instead of elements, show that also after a decade of "Semantic Web", the semantic markup of content of web pages will likely be based on a practical solution that is easy to implement for the html/web developer, as opposed to other methods that never really took off (such as microformats and RDFa).

          The things that seem promising in HTML5 are the canvas, storage for web applications, and geolocation but it will depend on whether you will really need to use it or not. If any of canvas, storage, geolocation or video interests you, and you are new to using them in HTML, then this book is way better way to get it right as opposed to finding examples online.

          Disclaimer: I received the e-book HTML5: Up and Running (valid for 30 days) from O'Reilly. I needed to know about the "video" tags anyways because I will be using them in deploying a website with a few hundred of videos soon.

          (1 of 1 customers found this review helpful)

           
          4.0

          Just the right depth across all of HTML5

          By prawsthorne

          from Vancouver, BC

          About Me Developer, Educator, Maker

          Verified Reviewer

          Pros

          • Easy to understand
          • Helpful examples
          • Well-written

          Cons

            Best Uses

            • Intermediate

            Comments about O'Reilly Media HTML5: Up and Running:

            I really liked this book! A "Dive into the future of web development" is exactly what the book did... Mark Pilgrim did an excellent job of covering the topic of HTML5 from end-to-end. The book doesn't do a deep dive on any of the many features of HTML5, it covers at just the right depth with lots of great examples and code for review.
            The order in which the book is put together makes a lot of sense for the experienced programmer and novice programmer (it's a long time since I was a novice programmer, yet the order makes sense from a learning perspective). The first chapter gets into the history of HTML (or mark-up languages) which puts things into context regarding mark-up and why HTML5 is so important. After this first chapter it starts with the important discussion regarding detection and the libraries available to quickly (and simply) use detection to best utilize the available HTML5 features. After these first two "introductory" chapters it methodically and with just the right detail dives into the full breadth of the new features within HTML5. I also appreciated the non-programmer related discussion on the why and history of some of the features and related technologies. The chapter on video and codecs is a good example of this.
            As I was reviewing the chapter outline of the book to be reminded of highlights, I couldn't find any. What I mean is all the chapters describing all the features were very interesting to me. And they were all well written and easily understood. I find it hard to find fault with this book; I was looking to read a great intermediate book on HTML5, and I found it with "HTML5 Up and Running". I'd recommend this book to any developer or designer wanting to get a good technical description (with examples) of the new HTML5 features.

            (4 of 4 customers found this review helpful)

             
            4.0

            This is the book we are looking for

            By mikael1000

            from Gothenburg Sweden

            About Me Designer, Developer, Student

            Verified Reviewer

            Pros

            • Accurate
            • Concise
            • Easy to understand
            • Helpful examples
            • Well-written

            Cons

              Best Uses

              • Intermediate
              • Novice
              • Student

              Comments about O'Reilly Media HTML5: Up and Running:

              The book is easy to follow and understand. I was looking around for a book to get me (html/xhtml programmer) into HTML5. I found it hard to find a book for me. But this book does the job.

              I also like the reference to other resources that deals with the things he just wrote about. I noticed that I did not like to read the book without internet access. cause I use the links he provide in the book all the time.

              But the links in the book that points to he's own stuff seams to be broken all of them. I get pages like "Gone. change your ref... bla bla bla".
              And the link to the blog that he reference the whole explanations in the first chapter is "Gone"!!!

              Anyway I just think the persons that want to learn HTML5 (beginner or not) should use this book.

              (3 of 3 customers found this review helpful)

               
              4.0

              Nifty little book

              By joshSVUG

              from Santa Clara, CA and Tel Aviv, Israel

              About Me Developer

              Verified Reviewer

              Pros

              • Easy to understand

              Cons

              • Digressions

              Best Uses

              • Intermediate

              Comments about O'Reilly Media HTML5: Up and Running:

              Hats off to Mark Pilgrim, his nifty little HTML5 books does get you "up and running" in no time. This is a great starting point for HTML5.

              That said, I found two major digressions
              - How are standards are made (even the author points out this is a digression) - this one is somewhat related and can be skimmed.
              - Video Encoding - as this is a book on HTML5, a pointer in the Further Reading should have sufficed.
              I personally think these sections made the reading "awkward".

              As I can't use HTML markup in the review, I had to avoid using data-vocabulary.org/Review/ microdata :)

              please note that I have received a review copy from the publisher.

              (7 of 8 customers found this review helpful)

               
              4.0

              header... footer... nav... what?

              By E Fitz Smith

              from NY Metro Area

              About Me Communications Designer

              Verified Reviewer

              Pros

              • Easy to understand

              Cons

              • Not comprehensive enough

              Best Uses

              • Intermediate

              Comments about O'Reilly Media HTML5: Up and Running:

              If only a few words were the key to opening up immediate production in HTML5. "HTML5: Up and Running" is one of few books that comes close to explaining that path in the least amount of words.

              Some people don't care about HTML, no less HTML5. Some people are wearing the new badge of HTML5 code right out on their sleeves. Like the W3C.

              They are so excited - they commissioned a slick, sexy HTML5 logo website while waiting for the final HTML5 tablets to come down from the mount… on the way to us... some eon from now.

              The ease of this new markup is exemplified in the comfort that the binders of books, as well as the web authorities, feel in allowing us all to dip our hands in while the batter is still being stirred on HTML5.

              'HTML5: Up and Running' from O'Reilly.com is not afraid to dish it out in economical slices. In the speedy evolution of technical web publications, 'Up and Running' is a mid-step to larger, more verbose books that are just hitting the market. Released early enough to be modest in page quantity but dense enough to explain all the essential aspects, a cheeky dash of humor is included inside for free.

              Myself, as a communications designer, I am very happy with the way charts and diagrams are designed consistently through the book. I love the horizontal comparison charts that measure browser compatibility. The design helps to distinguish this information from the stacks of code throughout the text. As an illustrator, I'm dying to get HTML5 Canvas carved into my brain cells. This is a good introduction to forming images via markup but I need more visuals to really know how that happens outside of the flattened page. I'm reading the book in bound and PDF formats. Great advantages to the copious hyperlinks in the PDF format. Bound version is small and easy to slip into the bag for educating yourself on the fly.

              efitzsmith.com

              (3 of 3 customers found this review helpful)

               
              4.0

              A good intro into HTML5 features

              By The Digital Doorman

              from San Diego CA

              About Me Developer

              Verified Reviewer

              Pros

              • Accurate
              • Concise
              • Easy to understand
              • Well-written

              Cons

                Best Uses

                • Intro

                Comments about O'Reilly Media HTML5: Up and Running:

                HTML5 Up and Running starts with some history, gives details about how to sense the level of the browsers support for different HTML5 features, as well as information about many of the features. Some of the key new features covered are: the drawing canvas, audio/video, geolocation, local storage, off-line caching of pages, as well as form additions.

                This book is well written and does a good job with what it is trying to do. This book brings up many of the new features that are added with HTML5 and gives enough details to get the reader started playing with the features. In some areas there is quite a lot of detail, but the reader will want to use examples and details on the web to augment the book when programming.

                The book is not an HTML reference. It just covers what is new in HTML5 so someone new to HTML should not expect to come up to speed on HTML with this book. For readers, like myself, who are familiar with HTML and want to get an understanding of what's new with HTML5 this book is a good fit.

                (5 of 6 customers found this review helpful)

                 
                5.0

                HTML5 Up and Running by Mark Pilgrim

                By Tony Dunsworth

                from Independence, MO

                About Me Designer, Developer

                Verified Reviewer

                Pros

                • Accurate
                • Well-written

                Cons

                • Too focused on Modernizr

                Best Uses

                • Expert
                • Intermediate

                Comments about O'Reilly Media HTML5: Up and Running:

                Mark Pilgrim, author and organizer of the website Dive Into HTML5 has also penned a book about the topic published by O'Reilly Press entitled HTML5: Up and Running. The book, as it is named is designed for web developers to give them a good jump start into HTML5 and all of the promising API's and tricks which it promises.

                After reading the book, I can certainly state that I know a lot more about using HTML5 than I did when I started. This is fantastic for me in light of the fact that my parent site for this blog, not the blog itself, is written in HTML5 and now I have tons of ideas for re-writes. The first three chapters of the book focus on what prompted the new version of HTML and how we got here, as well as the basic, including the new tags and the reduced requirements for composition.

                The next 4 chapters dive into the gory details of the , , and tags, as well as local storage. These middle chapters are certainly not for the faint of heart. There is both a ton of theory here and there are a lot of ways to circumvent browser support or the lack thereof.

                The final two chapters focus on forms and the future of extending the overall API. Both of which are interesting and poorly supported.

                Overall, I really enjoyed the book and learned a lot from it, but I wish he would have placed the forms along side the canvas, audio, and video coverage. I also wish he would have spent more time in the construction possible, like HTML5 Doctor. However, if you want to learn about this and start using it right away, here is the book for you. Grab a copy today. No wait, find a time machine and get the book 3 months ago!

                I did receive this book in return for the review.

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