MySQL and mSQL
Publisher: O'Reilly Media
Released: July 1999
Pages: 502

MySQL and mSQL are popular and robust database products that support key subsets of SQL on both Linux and Unix systems. Both products are free for nonprofit use and cost a small amount for commercial use.

Even a small organization or web site has uses for a database. Perhaps you keep track of all your customers and find that your information is outgrowing the crude, flat-file format you started with. Or you want to ask your web site's visitors for their interests and preferences and put up a fresh web page that tallies the results.

Unlike commercial databases, MySQL and mSQL are affordable and easy to use. If you know basic C, Java, Perl, or Python, you can quickly write a program to interact with your database. In addition, you can embed queries and updates right in an HTML file so that a web page becomes its own interface to the database.

This book is all you need to make use of MySQL or mSQL. It takes you through the whole process from installation and configuration to programming interfaces and basic administration. Includes reference chapters and ample tutorial material.

Topics include:

  • Introductions to simple database design and SQL
  • Building, installation, and configuration
  • Basic programming APIs for C, C++, Java (JDBC), Perl, and Python
  • CGI programming with databases in C and Perl
  • Web interfaces: PHP, W3-mSQL, Lite, and mSQLPerl
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oreillyMySQL and mSQL
 
1.8

(based on 10 reviews)

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1.0

MySQL & mSQL Review

By Ian Smith

from Undisclosed

Comments about oreilly MySQL and mSQL:

Reasonable for a grounding, but not up to usual ORA standards.

Knowing nothing about database design or coding, I spotted errors in the SQL examples (things like the text saying the database under discussion will have a particular field, but no mention of that field in the example code fragment). This makes me distrust the rest somewhat - and it's a pain to try and read the book in parallel with a printout of the errata. (Incidently - why so few confirmed errata? Some of them are patently obviously true, such as the discrepancies between text, tables and code fragments, but they're still languishing in 'unconfirmed'.)

In places it reads like each author wrote a different chapter, and they can't agree with each other. For example, in one chapter we're told that installing from source is best (if you have teh required compiler etc.) because it is more customisable, but in the subsequent MySQL chapter we're told that the vast majority of users should obtain a binary distribution.

On balance, it was worth me buying this book - but only because I got it half price in a stock clearance sale. In its current state it's just too sloppy. If the unconfirmed errata were addressed and the discrepancies between chapters cleared up it would probably be just about worth full price, but it's still not the gem that most ORA books are.

 
3.0

MySQL & mSQL Review

By Rich Furman

from Undisclosed

Comments about oreilly MySQL and mSQL:

I've been using this book for my forays into mysql and have found it met me needs. I wish it spent more time discussing SQL syntax in the the mysql environment, and can do without all the dross about the other languages; but I've gotten questions answered here, and that's what I ask.

 
1.0

MySQL & mSQL Review

By Bob Little

from Undisclosed

Comments about oreilly MySQL and mSQL:

I didn't want to pile on with the "let's beat up this book" group, but I have to.

Books like this don't need anything at all about installation. You probably already have the product installed before you bought the book. At the very least, the README's that come with a download, are much more relevant than what's in a book on the subject.

I was expecting more in the tutorial area, but was disappointed. Maybe I misread the back cover's "ample tutorial material" statement. If you are expecting a step-by-step how-to, then look elsewhere.

The first part on database theory moderately helpful, a bit too long. It was a hundred pages or so before I started noticing anything specifically about MySQL.

This book needs some further editing. I found the Perl chapter to be riddled with typos that, when copied, would not compile.

Drop the msql part too. Who needs it? It's like carrying on about DOS in a book about Windows 2000.

It was a mistake for me to buy this book. As expensive as computer reference books are, I don't want to make to many more mistakes like this one.

 
2.0

MySQL & mSQL Review

By Duncan Drury

from Undisclosed

Comments about oreilly MySQL and mSQL:

I bought this book with office money thinking it would help me learn SQL and MySQL. Now having delved into it, I find it annoying for the following reasons:



It says in the back it contains ample tutorial material.

This is simply not true!

The book is not written sequentially meaning you have to skip ahead several chapters in order to understand what is said at the beginning!



I think that this book was poorly edited. It reads like it was cobbled together from a number of short articles.

Further more the book is a bit old, and you are far better off following the installation instructions on the mySQL site than following what is in here.

The only plus point is that the book mentions in a couple of footnotes problems that occur in some binary distributions.

I bought this book because I wanted a book on mySQL. However I have found myself using the web anyway, and the book just sits there!

 
1.0

MySQL & mSQL Review

By Steffan Henke

from Undisclosed

Comments about oreilly MySQL and mSQL:

If I had read the reviews first, I would not have bought the book, but it's too late now.

Anyway, here are my comments:

This is the worsest O'Reilly book I own, and I have quite a lot of them.

The introduction to SQL and RDBS is somewhat OK, but to read on the back of

the book PHP, W3-mSqL, Lite, and mSQLPerl is really a

strong exaggeration of what is included about PHP in the book.

The so-called "chapter" about PHP is disappointing and full of bugs.

What is included, though, is a simple called "PHP Reference", taken from

the web, including ALL the PHP functions - big deal, I can find that on the web myself and don't need that in print in a book about databases.

But the authors get quantity by printing the reference. Not much work to

cut&paste from the web, I assume.

The last thing goes about the "examples". At least the perl examples better

fit in the "obfuscated perl contest" than in a book about MySQL&msql.

The book about installation of MySQL: I suppose it could be left out because

you should probably have installed your MySQL and/or msql if you are

going to buy the book, but that's a personal opinion.

Short: Don't buy this book.

Printer out of paper while printing the errata.

 
3.0

MySQL & mSQL Review

By Michael Armbrecht

from Undisclosed

Comments about oreilly MySQL and mSQL:

For me as nearly a complete novice to SQL and RDBMS this book was quite helpful

for understanding the basics of how to design a database, but unfortunately

not more.

I agree with reviewers who stated already that this book should be split in

two.

I could not find the many typing errors, but I probably got e revised version...

Best part is the SQL reference, which covers my needs and prevents the book from

getting covered with dust on the top shelf.

Michael

 
2.0

MySQL & mSQL Review

By Roman Blöth

from Undisclosed

Comments about oreilly MySQL and mSQL:

This book should be divided into 2 or else solely focus on MySQL (who uses mSQL anyway?) and then be re-written to be more complete. The book-as-is doesn't really follow any single topic into depth.

The normalizing chapter could be more detailed, the insalling chapter seems to be the most complete, using the tools isn't much more than what "tool --help" delivers...

This book could be much better, but it isn't...

But then again there doesn't seem to be another book covering MySQL out there?!

 
3.0

MySQL & mSQL Review

By Ken Hansen

from Undisclosed

Comments about oreilly MySQL and mSQL:

I was *encouraged* to read this book by my Instuctor, since it was the course textbook, and I found it quite useful.

If I had to point to one thing that I liked best, that would be the *extremely* focused examples in the back - there were many 10-15 line programs that did exactly what I wanted to try out.

A good book, but I came to it with a bit of Relational DB exp., from DB2 and Oracle usage a few years back, so my needs from this book were different from, say, a newbie...

Ken

 
1.0

MySQL & mSQL Review

By Jeff Fulmer

from Undisclosed

Comments about oreilly MySQL and mSQL:

This book should have been divided in two. Juxtaposition of MySQL and mSQL leads only to less understanding of both. If you plan to cover two applications in one book, then divide the coverage in half. Pages 1 - 200 cover MySQL, pages 201 to 400 cover mSQL.

(1 of 1 customers found this review helpful)

 
1.0

MySQL & mSQL Review

By Joseph Eddy

from Undisclosed

Comments about oreilly MySQL and mSQL:

After reading the other reviews, I am glad to see that most of them agree with me.

I don't know how ANYONE could POSSIBLY praise this as a decent book. There are so many typos in the text and (especially) in the sample code that it's rediculous!

O'Reilly should be embarassed to have such a book in their lineup.

Although it explains nicely how MySQL and relational database systems actually work, it doesn't really give you much information on how to use one.

I also take a little bit of umbrage at the fact that the book assumes the reader is running the server he's using and has root privileges.

Bleurgh. A pile of stinky ----

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