UML in a Nutshell
By Sinan Si Alhir
Publisher: O'Reilly Media
Final Release Date: September 1998
Pages: 296

Modeling languages have been used by system developers for decades to specify, visualize, construct, and document systems; rough sketches using stick figures and arrows and scribbled routing conditions go back still further. But the Unified Modeling Language (UML), for the first time in the history of systems engineering, gives practitioners a common language that applies to a multitude of different systems, domains, and methods or processes. It does not guarantee project success, but enables you to communicate solutions in a consistent, standardized, and tool-supported language.

All indications suggest that the industry is rushing to the UML. Created by leading software engineering experts Grady Booch, James Rumbaugh, and Ivar Jacobson (now of Rational Software Corporation), and accepted as a standard by the Object Management Group (OMG) in 1997, the language has already achieved more success than any previous contenders. With a firm conceptual and pragmatic basis, it is well suited to supporting projects in modern languages like C++ and Java. And standardization lays the groundwork for tools as well as standard methods or processes.

This book presents the UML, including its extension mechanisms and the Object Constraint Language (OCL), in a clear reference format. For those new to the language, a tutorial quickly brings you to the point where you can use the UML. The book is concise and precise, breaking down the information along clean lines and explaining each element of the language. Introductory chapters also convey the purpose of the UML and show its value to projects and as a means for communication.

Topics include:

  • The role of the UML in projects
  • The object-oriented paradigm and its relation to the UML
  • Tutorial with realistic examples
  • An integrated approach to UML diagrams
  • Class and Object, Use Case, Sequence, Collaboration, Statechart, Activity, Component, and Deployment Diagrams
  • Extension Mechanisms
  • The Object Constraint Language (OCL)
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oreillyUML in a Nutshell
 
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1.0

UML in a Nutshell Review

By Marco A

from Undisclosed

Comments about oreilly UML in a Nutshell:

This is probably the worst nutshell book I have ever read. If O'Reilly produces a UML 2.0 version I suggest they get a new author. I am quite familiar with UML and this doesn't come close to being useful. sorry. Have your authors read a good nutshell book like "Java in a Nutshell" before they start writing.

(1 of 1 customers found this review helpful)

 
3.0

UML in a Nutshell Review

By Tim Mason

from Undisclosed

Comments about oreilly UML in a Nutshell:

In the review I posted yesterday, I forgot to mention the positive points: "UML in a Nutshell" has the classic Nutshell virtues of being complete, concise and correct. Especially concise.

For example, if you look up the term "qualifier" in Rumbaugh's UML Reference Manual, you'll find nearly seven pages of detailed description, discussion, diagrams and cross-references. Look it up in the Nutshell book, and you'll find a half-page entry that gives substantially the same facts, organised into bullet points. The UML Reference Manual is better when you're learning UML or extending your knowledge; but when you're in the "muck-and-bullets" of actually working on a model, the Nutshell book is much more useful.

 
3.0

UML in a Nutshell Review

By Tim Mason

from Undisclosed

Comments about oreilly UML in a Nutshell:

I bought this book two years ago, when I made the transition from programmer to system architect. The project I was getting involved with used UML. The Three Amigo books were available, but I bought this because of past happy experiences with Nutshell books.

The book, in combination with a short course I attended, got me started. However, I can't really recommend it as a starting point. I found it better to learn UML through other means, and use this book as a reference. For that purpose, it was excellent.

The main flaws in the book are:



it uses UML 1.2. This is a problem, because UML 1.3 has changed greatly in certain respects, especially in the use case diagrams.

the book seems to be aimed more at programmers than at analysts and designers. The examples of classes are very much the sort that programmers come up with; basically data tables with accessor (get and set) methods.

the tutorial is not suitable for beginners.



On the whole, I'm pretty positive about the book as a reference work, but it is badly in need of a revision. I suggest the revision should be more "Nutshelly", concentrating on presenting the notation and concepts within a Unified Process context, rather than trying to teach UML.

 
2.0

UML in a Nutshell Review

By M.E.

from Undisclosed

Comments about oreilly UML in a Nutshell:

A so-so book that should not have that many errors in its content.

Too bad ... ORA have not updated the book w/ updated information on UML ...

Check out this book "Guide to Applying the UML" by the same writer.

It is a hardcover. ... Contentwise, it looks like a good book.

 
1.0

UML in a Nutshell Review

By Scott Emmons

from Undisclosed

Comments about oreilly UML in a Nutshell:

This book is a very big disappointment. I've always been a big fan of O'Reilly books, but this one proves that not all O'Reilly books are the cat's meow.

It's extremely boring and unpractical, offering absolutely no useful content - I know nothing more about UML after reading it than before, and certainly nothing that I was able to apply to my software engineering.

I usually read technical books from cover to cover, but not with this book!

Fortunately, there are other good books on UML (which I have), and put to use.

 
3.0

UML in a Nutshell Review

By M.E.

from Undisclosed

Comments about oreilly UML in a Nutshell:

I don't know why some of the reviwers were complaining about this book. From a reference's point of view, it is a darn good book! ... It was concise and terse enough that I got the job done. Improvement is needed. However, it is a darn good book! ...

Most Nutshell books are technically designed to be a technical references. Correct!? ... If the complainer(s) wants to read something that is complex (Try the uml section pages from Rational.com.) or write one themselves.

... Agreed with previous reader. ... UML Distilled first. Then this book later. ... Look forward to "UML in A Nutshell" (2nd ed.)!

 
4.0

UML in a Nutshell Review

By Umapathy S

from Undisclosed

Comments about oreilly UML in a Nutshell:

I am disgusted to see most of the readers (starters) found this book not useful. This book is not a tutorial and more targeted towards experienced people who know actually and did Object Oriented Analysis/Design/Programming (I think the prerequesties are pretty clear). It is very good as a desktop quick reference as it avoided me to go through UML Specification. I think you cant refer to the Three Amigos book all the time. Although the author has his own views, he could have avoided the chapter on Object Orientation.

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